Harry Kazianis reviews Nikki Haley’s record as ambassador to the U.N. and finds it very lacking:

That was my problem with the ambassador. Not that she did a bad job, not that she was a terrible representative of our nation’s interests, but simply that she lacked of the experience and natural abilities needed in such a role. Spitting back Trumpian rhetoric is not enough to be credible on the world’s stage.

Kazianis is right that Haley was ill-prepared for the job, and I would add that she made a habit of making false claims, unreasonable demands, and unnecessary threats. Whether she was threatening military action over missile tests, telling lies about the nuclear deal with Iran, or warning that the U.S. would be “taking names” of the states that didn’t fall in line, Haley proved herself to be a poor diplomat and an ineffective representative of the United States. Her time at the U.N. was marked by unwarranted, cruel actions to punish the Palestinian civilian population, a disgraceful defense of the massacre of protesters in Gaza, and a misguided decision to withdraw from the Human Rights Council. While the world’s worst humanitarian crisis intensified in Yemen with U.S. support for the Saudi coalition, Haley was too busy trying to distract everyone’s attention by shouting about Iran.

Haley didn’t have a good grasp of substance, and instead relied on talking points to a fault. Kazianis quotes a Republican consultant’s view of the ambassador:

“Haley was a great spokesperson for the administration; in fact, she was great at parroting whatever lines Trump wanted her to deliver,” the consultant continued. “But for anyone who has ever interacted with her, one thing became very clear. The second she left the land of talking points, any time she was asked to discuss any issue in any depth, it was apparent there was nothing there. And that is not what we need as ambassador at the UN.”

It is a sign of how little many of her fellow hawks care about substantive knowledge that several of them greeted news of her resignation with dismay. Max Boot described her resignation as a “sad moment,” and Bill Kristol began fantasizing about a primary challenge to Trump that will never happen. When these are the people touting Haley’s record, it is a safe bet that the U.S. will be better off being represented by someone else at the U.N.