New Urbanism

How ‘Interior Landmarks’ Redeemed New York

Even amid the glitz and dull modernism, the Western tradition is alive.

How to Keep Walking In a Winter Wonderland

In colder climes, pathways must be cleared of snow for pedestrians—not just cars.

This Suburb Won’t Become a Pedestrian Paradise

Car-dependent development muddles along. But some places could collapse.

What It Actually Costs to Maintain An Older House

If Rust Belt cities stay too inexpensive, every homeowner suffers.

When London’s Dragons Ruled Before Skyscrapers

Out-of-scale glass towers are destroying the historic character of this once beautiful place.

Urban America: For Richer or For Poorer

Reflecting national trends, our cities are forming two tiers, self-sorting into haves and have-nots.

What Tokyo’s Tsukiji Fish Market Teaches Us About Urban Planning

Cities need to be open social spaces, more ecosystems than cold machines.

MORE IN New Urbanism

Did the Golden Age of Department Stores Bring Us Together?

Mass-market retailers were always in tension with local, neighborhood shops.

The Fury of the Modernists

For almost a century, the architecture establishment has insisted on rigid ideology.

Why Pittsburgh Is a Planner’s Dream and Nightmare

As in New York, Robert Moses snarled traffic.

When Did Gentrification Become A Dirty Word?

Are the caricatures of urban transformation ruining the positive things that are happening economically and culturally to cities?

A NYC Tenement Legacy Persists, Despite Gentrification

Photographer Jacob Riis charted the perils of industrial urbanism, still seen in this corner of the Lower East Side.

If a Tree Falls in a Bedroom Community, Does It Make a Sound?

Towns once had full and vibrant lives throughout the day and night. Not so with modern suburbs.

Trader Joe’s: Good Food and Good Urbanism

It’s a good example of how retailers might have made America better had they thought more about design and customer service.

The Methodist Paradise on the Jersey Shore

This preserved village is an expression of incremental urbanism built exclusively for human interaction and divine inspiration.

Why Can’t I Afford to Live Here?

Zoning, financing, creative construction—cities and states need to help regular people live where they work.

No, Edward Hopper Did Not Hate the City

The dark force in Hopper’s imagery is not urbanism—it is the disruptive march of industry.