New Urbanism

How Le Corbusier’s American Dream Became a Nightmare

Traditional urbanism represents the cumulative wisdom of building the human habitat.

The Metaphysical Nature of Our City Temples and Tombs

They are massive, immovable, as though the spirit contained in them has been fixed forever to the ground.

Danny Thomas Almost Killed Me

Adventures in walkability in Memphis.

City Planning and Externalities Your Grandma Could Live With

Why municipalities unnecessarily churn out reams of rules.

Downtown Los Angeles Is Coming Home—to the New Elite

The last frontier of Southern California is in the former Skid Row.

Urban Growth and the Fallacy of Control

To make our own neighborhoods better, forget grand plans—and improve them incrementally.

Suburban Archaeology and America’s Architectural Commons

Tacky or not, America’s commercial strips and “placeless places” have developed their own historic, layered aesthetic.

MORE IN New Urbanism

Arlington Should Deny Amazon $51M in HQ2 Subsidies

Before it succumbs to price explosion, the D.C. ‘burb needs to play hardball.

Toledo Wants Local Control to Save Lake Erie

The feds did nothing to fix the toxic algae bloom so the city gave the water its own rights.

Car Culture and Suburbia in the American Psyche

Urbanism can and should work in America, but the mythos of the open road still calls.

A Lost Monument to Industry—and Traditional Urbanism

The Singer Building was an early skyscraper that respected the skyline.

How ‘Interior Landmarks’ Redeemed New York

Even amid the glitz and dull modernism, the Western tradition is alive.

How to Keep Walking In a Winter Wonderland

In colder climes, pathways must be cleared of snow for pedestrians—not just cars.

This Suburb Won’t Become a Pedestrian Paradise

Car-dependent development muddles along. But some places could collapse.

What It Actually Costs to Maintain An Older House

If Rust Belt cities stay too inexpensive, every homeowner suffers.

When London’s Dragons Ruled Before Skyscrapers

Out-of-scale glass towers are destroying the historic character of this once beautiful place.

Urban America: For Richer or For Poorer

Reflecting national trends, our cities are forming two tiers, self-sorting into haves and have-nots.