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The Week’s Most Interesting Reads

Abu Ghraib goes to court. Kelley Vlahos reports [1] on the role of private contractors in detainee abuse at the prison and the progress of the suits filed by the victims.

Wendell Berry, Burkean. Gracy Olmstead interviews [2] Berry on writing, politics, localism, Christianity, and war for the current issue of TAC.

The victims of our wars. Charles Simic rails [3] against the public’s indifference to the victims of U.S. military action.

How Vietnam haunts the Democrats. Michael Cohen considers [4] how LBJ’s decision to escalate in Vietnam continues to affect Democratic foreign policy thinking for the worse to this day.

What the Vietnam War hawks got wrong. Robert Farley refutes [5] a strange attempt to rehabilitate the arguments of the war’s loudest supporters.

Libya’s unraveling. John Lee Anderson reports [6] on the country’s ongoing civil war.

The potential of a Webb candidacy. Bob Moser profiles [7] former Sen. Jim Webb and assesses his chances as a challenger to Hillary Clinton.

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2 Comments To "The Week’s Most Interesting Reads"

#1 Comment By Duncan On February 21, 2015 @ 11:54 am

I do have some criticisms of Farley’s article, though, though his basic point is correct. He says that the US lost “credibility” when we withdrew from Vietnam. In fact we’d lost “credibility” simply by fighting that war, especially seen in context with our other foreign adventures after World War II. But we must also have lost some “credibility” in conventional US-speak terms when our puppet/client Ngo Dinh Diem was ousted and assassinated in 1963: the US had given Diem’s generals permission to overthrow him because he was getting ready to negotiate with the NLF (“Viet Cong”) to end the war. He’d also become a liability in other ways, but if you want to talk about “credibility,” you don’t want your clients and potential clients to think about how the US will throw them under the bus when they cease to be useful to their American masters.

#2 Comment By El_longhorn On February 21, 2015 @ 7:55 pm

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