- The American Conservative - https://www.theamericanconservative.com -

View From Your Loony Bin

A reader sends these shots he took at the University of San Francisco [1] — which, I hasten to remind you, is a Jesuit university. O Fortuna, spin me down to the Prytania as fast as you can, baby:

Ew8C4oW [2] LGS6USB [3]

Advertisement
89 Comments (Open | Close)

89 Comments To "View From Your Loony Bin"

#1 Comment By Passing By On April 4, 2015 @ 7:31 am

Have read those posters and must say that I heartily agree with them both.

Life in America is A LOT EASIER FOR ME because I’m a white male able-bodied cis-gendered heterosexual with an education, a good job, and some money. And much of the benefit lies in things I don’t have to notice, like being able to take holidays with my family or using a public washroom.

I’ve always known that … as should anybody else who lucked into those societal advantages. Which is all that the posters say.

Yet you (and several come ters) seem to find them disagreeable. Maybe you explain why, instead of flipping them off.

#2 Comment By Passing By On April 4, 2015 @ 7:34 am

Last paragraph should read:

Yet you (and several commenters) seem to find them disagreeable. Maybe you should explain why, instead of flipping them off.

#3 Comment By Devinicus On April 4, 2015 @ 7:47 am

On a semi-serious note, what in the world do these people consider “earned” privilege? And is it therefore acceptable to exercise “earned” privilege?

Because those men with vaginas weren’t born with male privilege. They earned it!

#4 Comment By JohnE_o On April 4, 2015 @ 7:54 am

In a competitive market economy you must invest totally in your individual career—

Nah, dropping out of the game is always an option.

One simply has to be satisfied with less than ones potential maximized career and income prospects.

#5 Comment By Devinicus On April 4, 2015 @ 8:06 am

Here are the members of the Prytania town council, by the way (as listed on sheets):

[4], Psychology

[5], African-American Studies & Marketing

[6], Art + Architecture Department

That three assistant professors put this thing together with the support of the USF administration shows just how loony the place really is!

#6 Comment By Elijah On April 4, 2015 @ 8:26 am

As Siarlys and James Bradshaw have pointed out, rational discourse with this kind of thing is a waste. I also think this whole “Check Your Privilege” meme is disingenuous at best; its proponents don’t want you to simply check yourself, they want you to despise yourself, to repent of yourself, to change yourself according to an unspoken but perfectly clear “progressive” standard.

Should you refuse to “check” yourself, the consequences are clear: you become a pariah.

I also note that the fliers have a checkbox for “Christian”, not “Religious”. You if you have time off for Yom Kippur, Ramadan, etc. you aren’t privileged? I wonder how Franklin Evans feels about that?

And a serious question: it would appear from the fliers that various persons need to be “anxiety free” when using the biffy. But what about the anxiety of females using the same facilities along with a person who has a penis? What about their anxiety? In an age of sexual violence – an epidemic on campuses or not – isn’t this a real source of anxiety for many? How do we go about reconciling privilege with biology and safety?

#7 Comment By Sam M On April 4, 2015 @ 8:40 am

I have decided that from here on out I’m only going to “check” my privilege in the violent hockey goon sense.

#8 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On April 4, 2015 @ 9:07 am

What privilege can you check when you expect to get time off for MLK day?

When I drove a paratransit bus and belonged to Amalgamated Transit Union, our contract included MLK Day as one of the paid holidays. This brought me up against the fact that its not a REAL holiday, because only banks and government offices close. Retail businesses are open, many other businesses are as well, all the day programs and clinics are open, and all the disabled passengers need their usual rides to their usual destinations.

So none of us drivers got the day off. We did get holiday pay (straight time for normative shift) plus straight time for actual hours worked.

I once suggested to the shop steward who preceded me in the office that we should offer to trade in the paid holiday for a more substantial increase in hourly pay. The paid holiday would be all right if everyone in America spent the day at home cooking a big family meal and watching non-stop broadcasts of movies like “Parting the Waters” plus genuine newsreel of Bull Connor sicking his dogs on civil rights marchers. But we don’t, so why bother?

(M_Young would say those of us who actually appreciated such a holiday have some sort of privilege he doesn’t, but I’m not sure what to call it. “Race traitor privilege”?)

#9 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On April 4, 2015 @ 9:26 am

Yet you (and several come ters) seem to find them disagreeable. Maybe you explain why, instead of flipping them off.

Game on.

As several people have already pointed out, there is a wide range and variety of “privilege” running around out there. It clumps and thins out in various ways, but the distribution is not neatly polar, as the deservedly maligned products of the psychology department insinuate.

One could construct a counter-factual, “If you can’t get fired from your job for incompetence because you would file a complaint with the EEOC, you have black skin privilege.” M_Young would jump on that — he’s often said similar things. There is not a complete absence of factual basis to it. On the other hand, I have a good friend who filed an EEOC complaint against Target because they had passed him over for promotion, and I suspect the complaint was valid.

So, every good thing can be perverted, and the existence of perversion is not an excuse to can every good thing.

I’m off on a bit of a tangent, but you asked for a serious response to a complex question. For me, the reason this nonsense is so pathetically deserving of sarcastic dismissal is that, taken to the nth degree, as these idiots who pass themselves off as psychologists do, destroys our common humanity. We would split ourselves into smaller and smaller tribes, with smaller and smaller identities, that mean less and less. I recoil from the prospect.

I could be wrong about you in specific, but its my general observation that those who angst over being “white male able-bodied cis-gendered heterosexual with an education, a good job, and some money,” do not generally live among and interact socially with many people of terribly different descriptions. Believe me, outside of academia, most people of African descent do NOT want to hear very very lightskinneded people talking like that. They long for the same thing most “white” people not wrapped up in academia long for — to be able to have a normal converation with a person of another color WITHOUT worrying about “oh my God, what is this person thinking about my color and their color and what I’m thinking about their color even if I’m not really thinking what they think I’m thinking…”

We don’t end racism by wallowing in it. We end racism by throwing it away. Yes, those who have a congenital melanin deficiency more or less have to take the first step, because racism as we know it today in North America was invented by some opportunistic dudes who called themselves “white,” with the prospect of a nice profit over the distinction. But they sold a lot of “black” people on the lie too, and their descendants have a lot to throw away also.

As to the other categories, the sheer tedium of parsing it all makes one want to either throw a punch, or laugh. I prefer laughter.

Finally, I’ve become disenchanted with “gay liberation” because they want approbation, not merely the right to be left alone. They have a right to be left alone — not because they are gay, but because we all have that right. They have the right to be treated in commerce like anyone else — not because they are gay, but regardless of the fact that they are gay. But frankly, I don’t have to admire their private choices, I can think there is something terribly wrong with them, and if they disagree, they can ignore me.

As for access to public bathrooms, what 99 percent of the human species can use with minimal discomfort is what a public bathroom is going to conform to. I think its reasonable to provide single use facilities for any and all deviations from the biological norm. Nothing more. And don’t come whining to me about “privilege.” That’s narcissism bordering on sociopathic sollipsism, like you’re the only one in the world who matters, and everyone else must reshape their entire life to make you feel happy.

#10 Comment By Ping Lin On April 4, 2015 @ 9:35 am

Dang, only six of seven. I’ll have to do good deeds in this life so I can be reborn with more privileges in the next. :p

On a semi-serious note, I’m kind of surprised that they came up with only seven. I can already think of several that I possess that should fall under the umbrella of “privilege”: having functioning eyes, having enhanced musical ability, being born in a stable household, having functioning taste buds…

…and now I have a headache. So much for that privilege.

#11 Comment By Bernie On April 4, 2015 @ 9:58 am

hetzer,

According to this source of June, 2013, the number of Jesuits has been halved since 1973, dropping from 30,860 to 17,287. This drop will accelerate as a large number of current Jesuits are reaching retirement age.

[7]

#12 Comment By MH – Secular Misanthropist On April 4, 2015 @ 10:02 am

JonF said:

In men’s rooms at least proper etiquette requires simply ignoring other people. Conversation is allowed at sinks and mirrors.

Here’s a helpful video on Men’s room etiquette

[8]

#13 Comment By dominic1955 On April 4, 2015 @ 10:27 am

Steve Ruble,

“It’s not a criticism to point out someone’s privileges, and having privileges doesn’t mean you’re a bad person.”

Maybe not, but every person I’ve ever run into that talks about “privilege” or tells someone to “check their privilege” has been a sniveling social justice warrior and the privilege talk was their way of trying to shut you down.

So, I don’t take it as a constructive criticism or merely pointing something out. Its the verbal equivalent to wagging your finger in my face. I can discuss and argue with people completely mellow and cool but you get in my face like that and I go from mellow to white hot in no time.

“It just means that the world is structured so as to make your life a little easier than other people’s lives, and you may need to work a little bit to understand what life is like for those people. Is that such an awful thing?”

Why do you think the world was structured that way? Probably because us Privilegatti wanted it that way. If we wanted to sit in a circle and check our privileges and have struggle sessions about our microaggressions, we wouldn’t have made these privileges for ourselves in the first place.

Do you think I give a damn that many places are off from work on Christmas but not Ramadan or Yom Kippur? Nope, sure don’t. Do you think I give even half of that damn that some dude who thinks he’s a chick gets the sh!t eye because he wants to go to the women’s bathroom? You guessed right-could care less.

“Yet you (and several commenters) seem to find them disagreeable. Maybe you should explain why, instead of flipping them off.”

Its a passive-aggressive way of trying to upend the social order. Our social order is hierarchy and will always be, per omnia saecula saeculorum.

[NFR: If you substitute “sinfulness” for privilege, the moralistic nanny-goatism of the SJWs becomes clear. These people are left-wing secular church ladies. — RD]

#14 Comment By Eric On April 4, 2015 @ 10:45 am

If you are able to spend your time constructing elaborate bulletins regarding social privilege instead of working for a living, you may have economic class privilege. Please check the box.

#15 Comment By Geezer On April 4, 2015 @ 10:49 am

Is there such a thing as a “sanity” privilege?

#16 Comment By Charles H. Featherstone On April 4, 2015 @ 10:54 am

Fun fact. When I worked for The Saudi Gazette (the English-language publication of Okaz, Saudi Arabia’s largest daily newspaper in Arabic, and the Kingdom’s scandal sheet) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, all Christian employees got Christian religious holidays off. Including most, if not all, of Holy Week.

Of course, Muslims got Islamic holidays off (Eid al-Adha, Eid al-Fitr, which is basically three days of celebrating at the end of Ramadan) and reduced work schedules during Ramadan. I suppose had someone made a case for Lent…

#17 Comment By David J. White On April 4, 2015 @ 11:25 am

I also note that the fliers have a checkbox for “Christian”, not “Religious”. You if you have time off for Yom Kippur, Ramadan, etc. you aren’t privileged? I wonder how Franklin Evans feels about that?

When I was in graduate school at Penn, instructors were told not to give exams or make assignments due on Jewish holidays.

Yet you (and several come ters) seem to find them disagreeable. Maybe you explain why, instead of flipping them off.

Because there is more than whiff of petulance, whining, and envy about them. “Mommy! Billy’s life is easier because he was born with white skin and a penis! That’s UNFA-A-A-AIR! WAAAH!”

BTW, don’t people who grow up as native speakers of English in our society have an advantage over those for whom English is a second language? And given how dominant English is in international business and the tech industry, that advantage extends far beyond our borders. I wonder if any of these SJWs has thought to check his or her Anglophone privilege? Not to mention that most of these people probably are where they are in life because of the social and economic circumstances in which they were born, raised, and educated, which they presumably did little or nothing to earn. As Eric points out, complaining about other people’s “privilege” is a luxury available only to those whose position in life is secure enough to give them time on their hands with nothing better to do.

If I’m not a robot, should I check the box for “organic privilege”?

#18 Comment By John On April 4, 2015 @ 11:56 am

Well, I took the privilege test that one of your readers linked too and was astonished with the results. I am a white, middle class, cisgendered slightly overweight American male and got a -20, presumably because I am not a male model with a 20″ waistline and am gay.

I was privileged enough to be raised by two living, caring parents in a crime-free middle class suburb with good schools. I was privileged enough to live in a country that respects my right to privacy, free speech, and religion and I am privileged enough to live in a state that offers protections to gay people.

I can see the “check your privilege” exercise can be useful if it makes us all think about how lucky we are and how others may not be so fortunate.

We are all, however, privileged in one way or another and my results might have been far better (or worse) if other questions were asked? I am not a public employee who would have the luxury of having a job for life with 13-14 recognized holidays. Would that put me at a -30?

But then I wasn’t asked if I was raised by both parents or if I was raised in a state that recognizes gay marriage. Wouldn’t those account for something that should increase my score? Being gay may be a disadvantage and in Alabama or Mississippi it might be a -10. (I bet in Iran, Saudi Arabia, or Uganda it is a -100 and in Poland a -20 but if I live in a state like New Jersey or New York shouldn’t the disadvantage be, maybe it is at most a -5 (and probably a -1 in Norway or Sweden).

How would we measure health care access? That wasn’t asked either? I work at a job with good benefits. Many people do not. In some European countries everyone gets health care though there might be long waiting times so how does one account for that? And how does one account for different values? Some people prize freedom over comfort while others value comfort over freedom.

I don’t know. “Checking your privilege” could be a useful exercise as far as it goes. Sure, let us use this to count our blessings and to treat those who don’t have what we have more humanely but there are any number of factors that or boxes that we can check off and they have to be weighed differently depending on where we live.

#19 Comment By Passing By On April 4, 2015 @ 11:58 am

Siarlys Jenkins —

Thank you for a courteous and serious answer. A few thoughts in response …

“there is a wide range and variety of ‘privilege’ running around out there”

Very true … the posters’ list is incomplete. But every poster must address some topic, leaving others unaddressed. The question is–Have these posters chosen a worthwhile topic and said something useful about it?

My answer would be Yes and Yes. The forms of privilege they list are real and important. And the examples they give are interesting, because they’re easily overlooked.

“destroys our common humanity. We would split ourselves into smaller and smaller tribes, with smaller and smaller identities, that mean less and less. I recoil from the prospect.”

But the posters urge us look beyond ourselves, to see how the world looks to others. That’s the way to break down the divisions between tribes, not to build them. You need to explain further on this one.

“I could be wrong about you in specific, but its my general observation that those who angst over …”

I’m not an academic, I’m a businessman. And I feel no angst whatever about my ethnicity, gender, etc. Merely thought the posters were true and interesting … and don’t understand the intense revulsion that they evoked from Mr. Dreher and others.

“Finally, I’ve become disenchanted with “gay liberation” because they want approbation, not merely the right to be left alone. They have a right to be left alone … They have the right to be treated in commerce like anyone else … But frankly, I don’t have to admire their private choices”

What you’ve described is just fine with me and (I suspect) with most gay people. But not with Mr. Dreher. He rejects that they “have the right to be treated in commerce like anyone else” … e.g., in buying wedding cakes.

“And don’t come whining to me about ‘privilege.’ That’s narcissism bordering on sociopathic sollipsism, like you’re the only one in the world who matters, and everyone else must reshape their entire life to make you feel happy.”

You’ve lost me here. Who’s asking anyone to “reshape their entire life”? The racial, religious, and sexual minorities we’re discussing here mostly want to be treated with everyday respect and left alone to get on with their lives.

#20 Comment By Passing By On April 4, 2015 @ 12:07 pm

dominic1955 —

“So, I don’t take it as a constructive criticism or merely pointing something out. Its the verbal equivalent to wagging your finger in my face. I can discuss and argue with people completely mellow and cool but you get in my face like that and I go from mellow to white hot in no time.”

Care to explain why these posters evoked such a “white hot” reaction, compared to (say) a Smokey the Bear poster warning about forest fires?

#21 Comment By Hibernian On April 4, 2015 @ 1:33 pm

@ Hetzer: “other, less heretical orders…”

Right on. You might consider copyrighting that phrase.

#22 Comment By John On April 4, 2015 @ 1:40 pm

That bathroom etiquette video deserves an award.

#23 Comment By Check Your Creepiness On April 4, 2015 @ 1:43 pm

If you post nasty little screeds like that on the walls of universities and work-places, CHECK YOUR CREEPINESS:

__ creepy to white people

__ creepy to males

__ creepy to those of normal sexuality

__ creepy to the able-bodied

__ creepy to the well-born

__ creepy to Christians

__ just plain creepy and no two ways about it

#24 Comment By David J. White On April 4, 2015 @ 3:05 pm

Oh, it’s Kurt Vonnegut’s The Sirens of Titan! At the end, he describes a society where all privileges are checked: strong wear weights, beautiful hide or disfigure their faces, don’t remember what smart do. Because Equality!

Also in his short story Harrison Bergeron.

If I’m not a robot, does that mean that I’m privileged? Or that I’m not? Would robots in the society Vonnegut describes have to wear some kind of electronic scramblers that keep their processors from functioning more quickly and more efficiently than the human brain?

#25 Comment By Viking On April 4, 2015 @ 5:25 pm

Passing By, I have to disagree with you on several things. Smokey the Bear isn’t accusing anyone, but rather passing along an urgent request to everyone. (So is Uncle Sam in the old “I Want You!” posters.) These USF posters are really quite exclusivist, in effect blaming people for being born or guided towards such “unearned privileges”. I can’t see where they lead to any insights about the perspective of others. It’s simply a litany of the various oppressors, as alleged by academics, usually the majority, except where gender is concerned. (I have no idea what they mean by “class”, so am not including that.) How could that unite rather than further polarize?

Speaking of “gender”, and women being the majority of adults in the country, is there really a good case for “male” to be included in this idea of “privilege”? I realize that I may take a lot of heat for this, but it strikes me that if women really wanted equality with men, they’d have gotten it a long time ago.

#26 Comment By Moone Boy On April 4, 2015 @ 5:45 pm

Jesuits, eh?

#27 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On April 4, 2015 @ 7:00 pm

The question is–Have these posters chosen a worthwhile topic and said something useful about it?

My answers would be no, and no. Now, you’re not wrong because I disagree, and I’m not wrong because you disagree. The patronizing, instructional tone of these cartoons strongly insinuates “We’re right, and if you don’t recognize how right we are, boy are you wrong.”

But the posters urge us look beyond ourselves, to see how the world looks to others.

Nonsense. Maybe you get that out of this stuff, and maybe that’s why you are sympathetic. I’m good at several lines of work precisely because I’ve learned to see how the world looks to the other person I’m talking to. But this stuff is the opposite of looking outside ourselves. Its more like “look inside yourself, cringe, vomit, and stay inside yourself. Shut up, and don’t talk to me about anything, because you ain’t a hill of beans.”

… e.g., in buying wedding cakes.

I’ve been offering the view her for some time that while anyone has a protected right to buy anything offered off the shelf, nobody has a right to require a photographer, a baker, a t-shirt maker, a print shop, or anyone else to participate in promulgating an expressive message they abhor. That’s what the cake episodes are about. Jewish delis don’t offer ham, and Elane Photography doesn’t do same-sex commitment ceremonies.

The racial, religious, and sexual minorities we’re discussing here mostly want to be treated with everyday respect and left alone to get on with their lives.

Oh, if only that were true. I think it is true of most of the individuals concerned. What the loud-mouth talking heads want is for everyone to genuflect to their particular world view, cater to their beloved peculiarity, and think The Right Thoughts. A lot of those talking heads aren’t LGBTQERWTWREYERTRT either. “Selma envy” is a most appropriate description. They want to reflected glory of past struggles, without any serious risk to their pretty precious selves.

You seem to have a reasonable sense of balance, but the authors of this stuff are off the deep end. They don’t deserve the credit you offer them.

#28 Comment By JonF On April 4, 2015 @ 8:39 pm

Viking, “Privilege” can adhere to minorities, even small ones. In fact that’s one of my reasons for disliking the privilege narrative– historically, “privilege” usually is something that is the preserve of elite minorities.

#29 Comment By M_Young On April 5, 2015 @ 12:05 am

“Life in America is A LOT EASIER FOR ME because I’m a white male able-bodied cis-gendered heterosexual with an education, a good job, and some money”

Maybe if you are a boomer. Certainly not for any generation of white males after that. Case in point, Los Angeles (the city) just did a ‘redo’ of their firefighter applications because too many white males made it. Well, guess what, a lower percentage, but still too many white males qualified again. the matter is being ‘looked into’.

White privilege is a myth.

#30 Comment By M_Young On April 5, 2015 @ 12:08 am

“Care to explain why these posters evoked such a “white hot” reaction, compared to (say) a Smokey the Bear poster warning about forest fires?”

Smokey the Bear posters are a general public serves that doesn’t target an ethnic group. The concept of ‘white privilege’ very much targets an ethnic group — one that is a minority in the city and the state in which these posters appear.

#31 Comment By M_Young On April 5, 2015 @ 12:36 am

“M_Young would say those of us who actually appreciated such a holiday have some sort of privilege he doesn’t, but I’m not sure what to call it. “Race traitor privilege”?”

LOL– we’ve been sparring too long Siarlys.

Actually, I used to like the MLK holiday when I was in college because we were on quarter system (started very early in January, like the first day after New Years)*, and a three day weekend two weeks later (and during ski season) made it an ideal time. But the point is well taken, MLK is the only american honored with his own holiday (plus a way bigger deal is made of the person being honored than for any other American holiday), so that certainly should be an opportunity for blacks to ‘check their privilege’.

*Surely basing a holiday on an arbitrary point in the alleged orbit of the Earth around the Sun privileges Copernicans vis-a-vis Ptolemians.

#32 Comment By dominic1955 On April 5, 2015 @ 1:53 am

Passing By,

“Care to explain why these posters evoked such a “white hot” reaction, compared to (say) a Smokey the Bear poster warning about forest fires?”

The posters themselves are just stupid and they are in places I probably will never be subjected to. However, the whole “check your privilege” crap I have run into personally.

Why does this make me mad? Well, like I said, I can really get into it with someone that is on the complete opposite end of the political or religious or whatever spectrum but have it be a really productive discussion. When people who have engaged me in discussion decide they are going to try to gag me with this “check your privilege” crap, I think it is completely antithetical to productive discussion, it tries to short circuit the whole thing by attempting to guilt certain classes/privileges/whatever into allowing other classes/privileges/whatever into becoming the new king of the hill. Its hypocritical and disingenuous.

The Smokey the Bear posters are just PSAs riffing the old Uncle Sam WWI or WWII recruitment posters. They are trying to be helpful and send a socially useful message. Its true, its me who prevents forest fires. To this very day, I know better than to flick cigarette butts (I don’t smoke, but still) out into areas that might have dry grass or undergrowth or not properly put out my campfires. Its simply common sense useful information. Smokey the Bear is pointing at me, sure, but he’s also not some shrill SJW blubbering irrationality all over me.

The “check your privilege” posters/mindset is liberal SJWs (and like Rod said, they are just the secularist equivalent of those annoying church ladies that think they need to be the hemline police) trying to disenfranchise the presently “ruling” (I use the term really loosely) classes and I won’t stand for it. I’ve had SJWs tell me, and my wife who would certainly be left of me politically, that our opinions on things like gay marriage or abortion pretty much didn’t count because we are white, middle-upper middle class, white collar types. In other words, we couldn’t possibly understand the nitty gritty of these things because we’re not real, we’re obviously just too busy sipping earl grey and eating cucumber sandwiches. The hubris of it all is that these people I’ve heard pull the privilege card are also white, straight, sometimes male and college educated. They might have chosen pretty worthless fields to go into and now make chicken scratch, but who’s fault is that? We are Americans, we’re all pretty much privileged beyond most of the world’s wildest dreams no matter if you’re a SJW with a self-inflicted worthless degree or doctor or a blue collar worker or someone living on welfare and food stamps.

Talking about privilege, what is it to be able to even have the leisure time to waste arguing about whether a disabled Jew lesbian or a transsexual Person of Color little person is higher up on the victim scale or form circular firing squads around your liberal but not batsh!t liberal enough comrades? Sounds like a whole boatload of privilege to me…

Check my privilege?! Go take a flying leap, jackasses.

#33 Comment By MH – Secular Misanthropist On April 5, 2015 @ 10:29 am

I find the whole check your privilege meme humorously futile. As Uncle Chucky says, any member of homosapiens I’ve met with privileges used them. This might play well on a politically left liberal arts campus, but in the real world at best you’ll get an eye roll.

#34 Comment By DN On April 5, 2015 @ 2:31 pm

Conspicuously absent from the list are the actual marks of privilege: wealth, education, and social connections. These posters were written specifically for educated San Franciscans. They allow the atheist lesbian, who grew up in a wealthy family, graduated from Stanford, and goes to parties featured in Fast Company to insert herself as the proletariat in the old marxist narrative, while viewing the Baptist preacher in rural Indiana she despises so much as her official “oppressor” (even if he lives in a mobile home). It’s a win-win, appeasing any lingering moral guilt for actual privilege and stoking the flames of moral indignation for the revolution.

#35 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On April 5, 2015 @ 10:31 pm

DN: +1000! This is all about people who want to have their CLASS privilege while FEELING proletarian.

#36 Comment By dominic1955 On April 5, 2015 @ 11:27 pm

I will second what Siarlys said about DN’s comment.

DN, that was an excellently perceptive analysis.

#37 Comment By M_Young On April 6, 2015 @ 10:27 am

I second dominic on the excellence of DN’s analysis.

[9] , btw, is an example of the reality of power in San Francisco. It’s hilarious that people such as these poster producers think they are ‘fighting the power’.

#38 Comment By Bob On April 7, 2015 @ 1:18 am

If you can go around university putting up posters which no one dares challenge in your hearing, for fear of being accused of vilification, what privilege ought you to check?

But more seriously, the whole exercise is philosophical nonsense, analogous to claiming to think or see aperspectivally.

#39 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On April 7, 2015 @ 10:29 pm

I think we have a new consensus emerging here. Thanks be to God.