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Radical Chic Real Estate

'Am I a Marxist?' asks Patri$$e Cullors (From her 'Am I A Marxist?' video)

You might have heard that Patrisse Cullors, a self-described Marxist and a founder of Black Lives Matter, has gone on a real estate buying spree. Excerpts:

As protests broke out across the country in the name of Black Lives Matter, the group’s co-founder went on a real estate buying binge, snagging four high-end homes for $3.2 million in the US alone, according to property records.

Patrisse Khan-Cullors, 37, also eyed property in the Bahamas at an ultra-exclusive resort where Justin Timberlake and Tiger Woods both have homes, The Post has learned. Luxury apartments and townhouses at the beachfront Albany resort outside Nassau are priced between $5 million and $20 million, according to a local agent.

The self-described Marxist last month purchased a $1.4 million home on a secluded road a short drive from Malibu in Los Angeles, according to a report. The 2,370-square-foot property features “soaring ceilings, skylights and plenty of windows” with canyon views. The Topanga Canyon homestead, which includes two houses on a quarter-acre, is just one of three homes Khan-Cullors owns in the Los Angeles area, public records show.

More:

Last year, Khan-Cullors and spouse Janaya Khan ventured to Georgia to acquire a fourth home — a “custom ranch” on 3.2 rural acres in Conyers featuring a private airplane hangar with a studio apartment above it, and the use of a 2,500-foot “paved/grass” community runway that can accommodate small airplanes.

The three-bedroom, two-bath house, about 30 minutes from Atlanta, has an indoor swimming pool and a separate “RV shop” that can accommodate the repair of a mobile home or small aircraft, according to the real estate listing.

The Peach State retreat was purchased in January 2020 for $415,000, two years after the publication of Khan-Cullors’ best-selling memoir, “When They Call You a Terrorist.”

In October, the activist signed “a multi-platform” deal with Warner Bros. Television Group to help produce content for “black voices who have been historically marginalized,” she said in a statement.

She owns two more houses worth over $1.5 million. “Champagne socialist” doesn’t even begin to describe it!

So, last night Cullors went on a friendly TV broadcast to explain that she’s using her money to help black people … and the black people she’s helping are her family members. Seriously, that’s her argument:

Here’s a story about the interview, including an embed of the entire thing. Excerpts:

She referred to her treatment by the conservative media as “misogynoir.”

Cullors added later: “The point of the articles is to discredit me and also to discredit the movement. We have to keep focused on white supremacy.”

Phony, phony, phony. Race hustling and woke capitalism have been very, very good to Patrisse Cullors. Meanwhile, Twitter put black journalist Jason Whitlock in Twitter jail for daring to criticize the posh Marxist, and Facebook wouldn’t let its users share the New York Post article on Cullors’ property buying. The Post editorial board writes:

The $3.2 million real estate spending spree of BLM co-founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors is newsworthy for two reasons. One, she’s an avowed Marxist, and as a public figure, it’s legitimate to question whether she’s practicing what she preaches. Secondly, as the article details, the finances of Black Lives Matter are opaque, a mixture of for-profits and tax-free nonprofits, and they don’t reveal how much its executives are paid. Are the people donating to BLM helping to pay for these properties?

We reached out to Khan-Cullors for comment before publication; she didn’t respond. After it was posted, her organization put out a statement saying yes, she used to take a salary from BLM, but doesn’t anymore, and the money she used to buy property came from her private income for book and development deals. Take the organization’s word for it. We added the response in full to our online article post-publication.

Then she accused us of being “abusive” and putting her at risk.

Our article features some pictures of the properties she bought, but includes no addresses, in fact doesn’t even say the city in some cases. Our reporter compiled the information from public records.

Khan-Cullors’ lawyers apparently got a more sympathetic ear at Facebook, however, and five days after the article was published, it suddenly decided that it clashed with its “community standards.” “This content was removed for violating our privacy and personal information policy,” Facebook writes.

This decision is so arbitrary as to be laughable. Does Facebook know how many newspapers, magazine and websites highlight the real estate purchases of the rich and famous? The next time People magazine covers Kim Kardashian’s latest mansion purchase, will it violate any community standards? How about running a picture of the resort Ted Cruz is staying at?

No, this rule has not been and will not be applied in any fair manner.

It again highlights just how much power these social media companies have over our lives, and our nation. They monopolized the market and became the main aggregators of news.

The Woke & The Powerful will always protect each other. Count on it.  It’s a racket.

about the author

Rod Dreher is a senior editor at The American Conservative. A veteran of three decades of magazine and newspaper journalism, he has also written three New York Times bestsellers—Live Not By Lies, The Benedict Option, and The Little Way of Ruthie Lemingas well as Crunchy Cons and How Dante Can Save Your Life. Dreher lives in Baton Rouge, La.

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