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Presbyterian Sex ’91 = Woke Porn ’21

Porn star Ana Foxxx is hurt and puzzled by why an industry that requires her to have sex on camera with multiple strangers doesn't treat her 'as a human' (Cosmopolitan screenshot)

Contemporary morality, courtesy of Cosmopolitan magazine:

Standing before her were eight white men, largely unmemorable except for what they all had in common: Confederate flag T-shirts and penises jutting stiffly out of their pants. She was here to have sex with all of them—she knew that; she’d signed the contract. But Ana Foxxx, then 23, was still trying to process the message, what was really being asked of her, when the director, another white man, pulled her into a side room. He showed her images on his computer of other Black women in videos just like this one. He told her that the experience would be fun and easy and quick. Everything would be over in 10 minutes. Was she cool with that?

Ana had shown up to the downtown L.A. warehouse alone. It was 2012, and this was only the third adult-film set she’d ever been on. None of the dozen or so crew members were Black, and aside from one makeup artist, Ana was the only woman present. She felt intimidated, like making a big deal about the scene would be awkward. “In my mind, I knew what was happening was wrong,” she remembers. “But people painted this picture to me that this is the kind of job you had to do to make it. I’m thinking to myself that this must be what you’re supposed to do, it’s normal.” She was also thinking about paying next month’s rent.

The scene began with Ana sitting at an outdoor table with a white man. He wants to show her how much she means to him, he says, take her ring shopping. In another version of this story, one where Ana was white, the camera might cut to the couple in fleshy missionary sex, maybe something just a little rougher. In this version, a stranger interrupts to serve the couple government papers telling them their relationship is in “violation of an interracial dating statute.” To prove Ana is worthy of marrying a white man, she must participate in … a series of blow jobs she’d have to give those eight men wearing the Confederate flag, followed by penetrative sex.

Then her knees were on the concrete. The air smelled like weed, and when Ana finished, a few of the men high-fived her. Everyone was nice, she says. So nice, in fact, that it felt like maybe what had happened to her wasn’t that bad.

The 19-minute video—which still streams on multiple porn sites, described on one as “black booty points toward the Union”—has now been viewed more than 1 million times. And Ana still can’t put it behind her. Recently, when she tweeted her support of the Black Lives Matter movement, she was overwhelmed with hateful comments: “Aren’t you that girl who slept with those guys in racist shirts?”

The article is about “racial inequity” for black women in the porn business. More:

This came up multiple times over the course of interviews with nearly two dozen Black women working in the porn industry, many of them speaking out for the first time: the lack of power, control, and respect, even as their bodies are used to make money for the very people taking advantage of them.

“We have predominantly white men directing and producing the majority of porn content, so everything is filtered through their gaze,” says Sinnamon Love, a Black-feminist pornographer and founder of BIPOC-AIC, a support group for people of color working in the industry. And whatever the director’s comfortable with goes: When one Black woman was in the middle of a threesome scene with two white men, they began calling her the N-word. “It felt almost rape-ish,” she says. But when she looked toward the white director, he did nothing.

Where do you even start with this? These women are degrading themselves by allowing these scummy men to have sex with them on camera for the viewing delight of perverts, but what really grieves them is the scummy men calling them the N-word?!

One more:

“Since the Black Lives Matter movement started, people have been taking their anger out on me,” says Hurricane Fury, who has been doing cam work for years. She usually starts her shows perched on her white couch in a skintight tube dress, legs lathered in glittery lotion, nails sparkling. On average, 40 people tune in to talk to and text her as she undulates onscreenwith her horniest fans splurging on private sessions for nearly $4 a minute. That’s in part how she makes real money, six figures a year, she says—but at what sometimes feels like a steep cost.

She’s been called the N-word and a “dirty coon,” told that she’s pretty “for a Black woman,” and asked if she picked cotton. It’s not unusual, she says, for “grown-ass white men” to start video-chatting her and, with their genitals in their hands, call her a Black bitch if she pushes back against their racist comments. “Those people can be a lot and there are times I just don’t feel like dealing with it,” she says. But this is her job. It’s what she wants to do. She’s proud of how successful she’s become. It’s just that she wishes she could work without being harassed.

This is disgusting all around. This is cruel, dehumanizing, and yes, evil. But what do these women expect? You are dealing with horrible people in this sicko industry. The idea that you want to make movies depicting people have sex in all manner of perverse permutations, but you want it to play by some kind of moral rules, is just bizarre.

It reminds me of a great old Camille Paglia essay titled “The Joy of Presbyterian Sex,” which came out in 1991, and which I couldn’t find in a linkable form (I screenshot passages from the essay collection, “Sex, Art, And American Culture,” in which it appeared in book form). She was making fun of a solemn report by the liberal Presbyterian Church (USA) laying down a new prim progressive vision of sexuality. Paglia thought it was ridiculous. Excerpts:

More:

And:

 

The conservative Calvinist theologian Carl Trueman wrote an essay about Paglia’s piece. He makes an important interpretive point here:

Yet there is another aspect to the essay, and that is Paglia’s barely concealed contempt for the attempts of liberal Christianity and of the gay lobby itself to make homosexuality respectable. For Paglia, sex is powerful and deviant sex reflects that power precisely because it is transgressive, because it breaks the rules.  For her, sex is an erotic, Dionysian force that threatens to shatter civilization as we know it.  Drawing on the later Freud, with distinct tones of Nietzsche, she understands the destructive power of sex and rejoices in it.  To tame it, to domesticate it, to make it respectable, to turn it into merely one more form of pleasurable recreation is to destroy both its substance and significance.

Her basic thesis is that liberal Christianity cannot cope with sex as it really is.  Instead it has to make into something anodyne and inoffensive as defined by the aesthetics of the wider world.   Cultural tastes trump biblical teaching and historic Christian ethics.  This is the problem of liberal Christianity in microcosm.  Make Christian doctrine merely an expression of religious psychology and, as sophisticated as that might seem, it leads in only one direction: the assimilation of Christianity to the world.

Here’s the point: these black female porn stars have chosen an industry in which they routinely participate in the most degrading human behavior possible, for the sake of entertaining people who find sexual transgression to be deeply pleasurable, because it appears to the reptile part of our brains. The entire purpose of their performance is to satisfy the most animalistic desires in viewers. It is beastly, in the literal sense. And yet, like woke Presbyterians, they want these trash-dick Dionysuses to repress expressing certain politically unpleasant forms of the contempt these have for all these women, simply by the fact of the kind of work they all do.

Women, you are not wrong to be disgusted by the racial contempt showered on you in this business. But you are fools if you think that the racial contempt can be separated from the anti-human hatred that is at the core of the porn business. You can’t have porn in which human beings behave animalistically in every way, except for restraining themselves to behave like liberal Presbyterians when it comes to the dark and demonic spite they have for their partners, when it manifests as racial hatred. What do these female performers think sadism is?

More to the point: what do they think the human heart is?

The problem is not racial inequity in porn. The problem is porn — and foolish porn stars who seem to think they can make an inherently inhuman, and anti-human, activity woke. Woke sex is the secular version of Presbyterian sex. Eros, as Paglia said, is a great and dangerous God. He’s not this guy:

about the author

Rod Dreher is a senior editor at The American Conservative. A veteran of three decades of magazine and newspaper journalism, he has also written three New York Times bestsellers—Live Not By Lies, The Benedict Option, and The Little Way of Ruthie Lemingas well as Crunchy Cons and How Dante Can Save Your Life. Dreher lives in Baton Rouge, La.

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