Home/Rod Dreher/Dreadlocks Hate Hoax

Dreadlocks Hate Hoax

Verily, our president is a crackpot. He might or might not need to be impeached — that remains to be seen. But if you want a good example of why a lot of conservatives are not going to be quick to surrender him, look no further than this disgusting story from suburban Virginia, via the Washington Post:

The sixth-grade girl at a private Virginia school who accused three classmates last week of forcibly cutting her hair now says the allegations were false, according to statements from the girl’s family and the principal at Immanuel Christian School in Springfield. School officials met with the girl and her family Monday morning before releasing the statement.

The 12-year-old, who is African American, said three white boy students held her down in a school playground a week ago during recess, covered her mouth, called her insulting names and used scissors to cut her hair.

The grandparents of the girl, who are her legal guardians, released an apology Monday.

“To those young boys and their parents, we sincerely apologize for the pain and anxiety these allegations have caused,” the grandparents wrote in a statement sent to The Washington Post by the school. “To the administrators and families of Immanuel Christian School, we are sorry for the damage this incident has done to trust within the school family and the undue scorn it has brought to the school. To the broader community, who rallied in such passionate support for our daughter, we apologize for betraying your trust.”

Last week, NBC Nightly News broadcast the allegations from coast to coast — proving that the mainstream media learned nothing from the Jussie Smollett hoax, or the Covington Catholic boys witch hunt. From the print version of the story:

Three sixth-grade white boys at a Christian school in Virginia where Vice President Mike Pence’s wife works cut a black girl’s hair, calling it “nappy” and her “ugly,” the girl says.

Amari Allen, 12, told NBC Washington that she was about to go down a slide during recess at Immanuel Christian School in Springfield on Monday when one of the boys grabbed her and put his hand over her mouth. The second boy grabbed her arms, while the third cut off some of her dreadlocks.

“They said my hair was nappy and I was ugly,” she said.

The key phrase in this story is “where Vice President Mike Pence’s wife works.” That’s the only reason why an unproven incident of schoolyard bullying makes national news: because it’s something that the media can use to trash Republicans. Of course this black 12-year-old who claims she was bullied on the playground at a conservative Christian school that employs Mike Pence’s wife must be telling the truth, because that’s exactly how white male conservative Christians behave — right? And of course a playground incident, the truth of which had not even been established must be reported as nationally relevant news.

I feel sorry for Amari Allen’s grandparents, her caretakers. They had the courage to come forward with the truth … but not after they had chosen to go on national television to denounce the school. Now Amari Allen has put her grandparents in a position to be horribly treated by racists — something that would not have happened had NBC and others waited to see if the story was true, or at least given some basis other than the testimony of one child, before reporting it.

I urge you all to read Douglas Murray’s book The Madness Of Crowds: Gender, Race, and Identity. Our nutty president tweets about a new civil war, but I tell you, if anybody is going to spark a civil war in this country, it will be people like this girl, and more importantly, the media that credit racist slurs like hers without investigation, because it fits their pre-determined narrative. In his chapter on the race madness that has overtaken America, Murray writes, of Ta-Nehisi Coates:

Coates not only exaggerates hurt, but does so knowing that all of the weaponry is now on his side. There is a gun loaded on the stage, but it is not the white men who are holding it, it is him. When students starting out on campuses across the US wonder whether making insincere claims and catastrophizing minute events can be rewarding, they can look to Coates and know that it is.

And:

Today there appears to be a return to a heightened level of rhetoric on race and a great crescendo of claims about racial differences – just when most of us hoped that any such differences might be fading away. Some people in a spirit of resentment, others in a spirit of glee, are jumping up and down on this quietly ticking ground. They can have no idea what lies beneath them.

They really don’t. And these are not things that occur separately from each other. If you read Murray’s book, you will see that the progressive ideology — intersectionality — links contemporary feminism, LGBT activism, and racial activism. These people have a lot of power in this culture — in the media, academia, in corporations, in other institutions, and in the government — and the prospect of them consolidating even more power quite rightly frightens conservatives.

Liberals love to tell themselves that we on the Right are exaggerating this stuff. We aren’t. This deranged ideology is taken as reality by progressives in power today. It may be the case that some conservatives decide that the danger posed by the Trump presidency is greater than the danger posed by progressive ideology in power. But many more will weigh the choice and decide that despite his flaws and failures, Trump in power is less damaging than handing over the state into the hands of ideologues who believe that white people (or straight people, or men, etc.) are guilty until proven innocent.

The Covington Catholic boys were held up to national spite by the media, based on something they did not do, but that the media wished that they had done. Now the same thing has happened on a smaller scale to three white male Christian middle-schoolers in Virginia, whose names, thank God, were not released. This will not be the last time this happens.

UPDATE: Of course. Of course!

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about the author

Rod Dreher is a senior editor at The American Conservative. He has written and edited for the New York Post, The Dallas Morning News, National Review, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, the Washington Times, and the Baton Rouge Advocate. Rod’s commentary has been published in The Wall Street Journal, Commentary, the Weekly Standard, Beliefnet, and Real Simple, among other publications, and he has appeared on NPR, ABC News, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and the BBC. He lives in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with his wife Julie and their three children. He has also written four books, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming, Crunchy Cons, How Dante Can Save Your Life, and The Benedict Option.

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