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Black Evangelical: ‘White People, Chill Out’

Black conservative Candace Owens. Black reader says Candace is not the only one (

Really interesting e-mail from a black woman who reads my blog, responding to the post about race, identity politics, and Evangelicalism.

I have been reading your blog for a few years and I think you are long overdue to feature the emergence of a growing number of black conservatives who are being ignored by the media. I awoke this morning and read your post about the woman who spoke at InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. As I read through the comments, I felt what has become an all-too-familiar feeling online. Namely, that I am living in an alternate universe where my family is the only black family which isn’t cowering in fear of latent white racism or overt discrimination from white evangelicals who owe me a “safe space” to be black.

I grew up in a home which was extremely religious and socially conservative, but also a family where my parents reliable voted Democrat. And so, when I first stepped into the voting booth in 1992 as an earnest 20-year-old, I voted Democrat as well. By 1996, I had done a complete about face. Carrying a child brought home to me the reality of abortion as the brutal, murderous act that it is. My parents didn’t change political affiliations with me, but as they came of age during a time of intense racial discrimination and unrest, I completely understood and appreciated their position. Black People my age and younger really have no reason to be so politically wed to any particular ideology to the extent that they are. That they are is the fruit of a highly effective educational and media propaganda campaign to embrace victimization wholesale. And not to their benefit, as any marginally observant person can see.

They are a contrast the numbers of black people I have encountered over the past few years who do not hate Trump, are quietly divesting from the Democratic Party –mostly because of the Tyranny of the Alphabet People — and are closet fans of people like Thomas Sowell, Candace Owens and Sheriff David Clarke. We are, indisputably, a distinct minority. I highly doubt that more than 10% of black voters will pull the lever for Donald Trump in 2020. What is worth noting, however, and is often ignored, is that a number of black voters are simply going to sit the thing out. They’re not going to vote for Trump, but they are also not going to vote for the agenda of people who think that “trans is the new black”.

The mainstream media and the people who run our government and academia are heavily invested in ignoring the growing number of blacks and other minorities withdrawing from their coalition. Since it seems important enough for them to hide it, it’s equally important for people with your platform and influence to periodically highlight it.

Not all black people (not even most black people) are afraid of being racially discriminated against. To the extent that they are, you can be sure and certain that they 1) live a very segregated lifestyle already and 2) get the vast majority of their news and commentary from CNN, MSNBC and the likes. No black person who lives and moves outside of their bubble is sincerely afraid of racial discrimination.

My experience has been the exact opposite. We are a homeschooling family whose children attend a part-time, classical Christian school. It should go without saying, but we are a minority in our educational community. My experience has been (overwhelmingly) one where I have had to implore my caring, sensitive white Christian friends to shed their sackcloth, ashes, and white guilt in my presence because it is not needed. More than that, it is not desired and is quite frankly, problematic. The evangelical church in America has, with few exceptions, gone the distance to forge racial reconciliation. I have frequently said to the people I interact with, “If you are loving everyone you meet with the love of Christ, there is quite literally NOTHING you can do to top that. Stop trying. It’s an affront to the faith.”

I honestly believe that if the black conservatives who are on the front lines received as much attention as the grievance peddlers, a lot more black people would feel free to come forward with their objections to the left’s narrative, and even more would be snapped out of the trance of comfortable mental oppression and begin to think outside the box. It may not mean that they will vote Republican, and I’m perfectly fine with that. As noted in your Tucker Carlson piece, it’s not as if the GOP has any lock on truth and righteousness. It’s more important that more of them withdraw their blind support for a Democratic Party that literally cares nothing about them, but rather uses the correct series of buzz words, with the expectation that they will react as predictably as Pavlov’s dogs. If that’s not racist, then I don’t know what is.

Lots to think about there. Thanks, reader. She posts here from time to time, so commenters should realize that in moderating comments, I draw a line against people speaking insultingly of those who are within this blog’s community. I know some of you liberal readers are going to get your backs up over this, but do it respectfully and civilly, or don’t waste your time writing a comment.

about the author

Rod Dreher is a senior editor at The American Conservative. He has written and edited for the New York Post, The Dallas Morning News, National Review, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, the Washington Times, and the Baton Rouge Advocate. Rod’s commentary has been published in The Wall Street Journal, Commentary, the Weekly Standard, Beliefnet, and Real Simple, among other publications, and he has appeared on NPR, ABC News, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and the BBC. He lives in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with his wife Julie and their three children. He has also written four books, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming, Crunchy Cons, How Dante Can Save Your Life, and The Benedict Option.

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