Emil Henry asks some ridiculous questions:

Will Romney be different from these other failed nominees? Could he defy the odds and make a comeback presidential bid capturing the GOP nomination after all the doubt, second-guessing and blame that accompany such a loss? According to the latest Quinnipiac poll, many Americans seem to think so—45 percent of voters said the United States would be better off today with Romney as president.

The short answers are no and no. If Romney can only get 45% to say the country would be better off with him as president, that represents a small drop in his support from 2012. I am very doubtful that all of the people answering this way would like to have another chance for vote for him. There is no appetite in the GOP to renominate any failed candidate, and that goes double for Romney. Henry mentions the interest among Romney loyalists for another campaign, but they must be the only people on the planet that desire this.

Romney was almost uniquely suited to energizing the opposing party while demoralizing his own side. Half of his party never trusted him, and the other half accepted him as the least objectionable alternative. The odds were always against a Romney win, but he was also a lousy general election candidate. His background as a former corporate CEO and multi-millionaire seemed to be custom-made to serve Democratic attacks, his economic agenda was irrelevant to the concerns of most Americans and was obviously geared to the benefit of the few, and he endorsed a thoroughly contemptuous view of almost half of the electorate. His foreign policy views varied between being laughable and dangerous, and on almost every major issue he was offering nothing more than warmed-over Bush-era ideas. He periodically tried to seize on foreign events to demonstrate his “leadership” only to confirm that he was a desperate opportunist looking to politicize anything to his advantage. There are not many Republicans that want to go through another campaign filled with that sort of political incompetence and vacuous policy arguments, and absolutely no one should want to put Romney back in a position where he might be elected president.