Arts & Letters

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of September 24

Here’s what our writers and staff are reading this week.

The Perils of Our Liberal Hegemony

John Mearsheimer’s latest book explores how progressivism gave us today’s foreign policy mess.

The Hollywood Child Abuse Epidemic No One Wants to Talk About

It’s time to cut to the dark heart of the child performer industry.

The Movie That Captured the Banality of Suburbia

The ‘Burbs scathingly satirizes post-Cold War bored America.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of September 17

From Tolkien to Alan Taylor, here’s what our writers and staff are reading this week.

You Buried the Queen but Soul Was Already Dead

Aretha Franklin prepared her fans for inspiration, but today’s pop singers are as far from church as they can get.

Why Major in the Humanities?

Too many students today equate it with activism—and not the good kind.

MORE IN Arts & Letters

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of August 27

Here’s what our staff is reading this week.

The Dark Side of War Propaganda

How is hawkish fanaticism whipped up at home? One exhibition offers insight.

The Great Gildersleeve’s Fight for the Classics

The idea that we can appreciate ancient Greece and Rome without learning their languages was once unfathomable.

Reconsidering Rudyard Kipling

Was the author and poet best known for ‘The Jungle Book’ and ‘Kim’ truly a racist imperialist?

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of August 20

Our writers discuss what they’re reading today.

The Confused Cynicism of Slenderman

The new movie packages a folk myth and sells it back to us, an act of cultural theft.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of August 13

From the “brain drain” of rural America to the rise of the meritocrats, here’s what our staff is reading.

The Hedonism of Reading Good Books

It’s a pleasure that infuses life with richness and it’s available for the price of a library card.

Simone Weil’s Deeper Grace

Who was this French mystic, who nearly starved herself for the Resistance, then looked for God’s love ‘in the void’?

Christopher Robin: A Winnie the Pooh Movie for Adults

Finally, a summer film that’s light on CGI and demographic pandering, and heavy on joy.