Arts & Letters

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of August 13

From the “brain drain” of rural America to the rise of the meritocrats, here’s what our staff is reading.

Simone Weil’s Deeper Grace

Who was this French mystic, who nearly starved herself for the Resistance, then looked for God’s love ‘in the void’?

Christopher Robin: A Winnie the Pooh Movie for Adults

Finally, a summer film that’s light on CGI and demographic pandering, and heavy on joy.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of August 6

From Ross Douthat to Henri de Lubac, our writers on what they’re reading today.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of July 30

From Christopher Lasch to the history of chess, here’s what our staff is reading.

The Bad and the Beautiful

#MeToo has forced the question: can we still enjoy the work of predatory artists?

Jonah Goldberg’s Burkean Turn

His latest book is a flawed but valuable warning not to forsake our national inheritance.

MORE IN Arts & Letters

Trump’s Working Class, Conservative, Populist Realignment

We’re getting a sense how this coalition came to be—but will it survive tomorrow?

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of July 23

From Tom Wolfe to Joseph Pearce, here’s what our contributors are reading this week.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of July 16

From Robert Sobel’s Coolidge to Ray Bradbury’s ‘wicked’ ways, our TAC editors on what they are reading today.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of July 9

Here’s what our editors and writers are reading.

Finding the Literary Truths in Alcoholism and Recovery

New memoir tackles personal addiction and familiar tropes about creativity under the influence.

How Corporations Won Their Civil Rights

The Court got it right—but it’s not a conclusion we should be entirely comfortable with.

Mister Rogers’ Ministry

A new documentary on the life of Fred Rogers rekindles the transformative power of neighborliness.

Globalization and Its Discontents

Ian Bremmer blames globalism for our populist moment. But does he overstate his case?

What Would Tocqueville Do?

James Poulos’s The Art of Being Free is a perceptive, though flawed, Tocquevillian analysis.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of July 2

Here’s what our staff and writers are reading.