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They’re Just Now Noticing This About Fox?

A conservative, Christian-oriented advocacy group has a new report out [1] blasting the Fox News Channel for what they consider to be its pro-gay bias. I haven’t read the report, and don’t plan to. Glancing at it, it doesn’t look like this group is anything but a fringe outfit. Still, the report, a link to which a friend sent over, makes me think that there must be many religious conservatives who actually think they have a special friend in Fox News Channel.

Ask yourself, Fox viewers: how often do you see religion covered on the network at all, much less the regular inclusion of conservative religious voices in regular news and opinion coverage? Fox has a religion correspondent, Lauren Green, but she’s rarely on air. Fox may trade on its reputation as friendly to conservatives, but it has never struck me as significantly more open to religious and social conservatives than its competitors. I think Fox has a natural audience among religious and social conservatives, but it’s not interested in cultivating them.

Am I wrong about this? Maybe I am. Let me know.

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46 Comments To "They’re Just Now Noticing This About Fox?"

#1 Comment By David J. White On August 14, 2013 @ 3:28 pm

To the extent that Fox News is really the Republican Party On The Air, its treatment of social and religious conservatives tracks that of the Republican Party, doesn’t it? It mouths all the right pieties to make social and religious conservatives think that it has their interests are heart, but at the end of day it doesn’t really do anything to advance those interests, especially if any real effort or sacrifice would be involved.

#2 Comment By Drew On August 14, 2013 @ 3:43 pm

I don’t know if I’d go as far as saying they have a pro-gay bias, but of course it depends on how you calibrate things. If the issue is “Should sodomy be criminalized by the state?” then yeah, Fox News and pretty much every other secular news organization is going to lean “pro-gay” on that. But if you’re looking at pertinent political disputes involving gay rights, then Fox probably comes down as mildly anti-gay to neutral. Which I think illustrates your point fairly well. It is political considerations, not religious or even moral ones, that drive Fox’s coverage and editorial slant.

Perhaps there’s also a business consideration – that this audience segment is shrinking or is more hostile to secular media and therefore more difficult to pry away, or that prying them away requires a significant editorial overhaul instead of just throwing them a few more bones now and then.

I’ll agree with you Rod that Fox isn’t really a friend to religious/social conservatives, but I’m not sure that’s a problem. There are plenty of other well-funded small and medium outlets throughout the media that cater to SoCons.

#3 Comment By Phil On August 14, 2013 @ 3:45 pm

Huckabee. He of Sandy-Hook-was-invited-by-secular-forces-kicking-God-out-of-public-schools fame. He has his own show. Bill O’Reilly has guests who advocate for religious points of view all the time and helps them shout down the sacrificial secular view.

#4 Comment By Cbalducc On August 14, 2013 @ 3:53 pm

The talking heads at Fox News seem to have no problem with this “marriage equality” business. And Rupert Murdoch is no Tom Monaghan. It would be interesting to read their e-mails to learn what some of these folks think about social conservatives.

#5 Comment By Zathras On August 14, 2013 @ 3:54 pm

Fox doesn’t generally attract conservatives by promoting their views. Fox attracts conservatives by constantly attacking liberals. It’s a mirror image of the problem that everyone knows what Republicans are against, but very little what they are actually for.

#6 Comment By JB On August 14, 2013 @ 3:55 pm

Fox News is little more than the “conservative-sounding” half of the welfare/warfare/surveillance party (CNN, MSNBC, the NY Times, Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, L.A. Times, etc., and other so-called “leftist” or “liberal” stations and newspapers being the other half).

Best move for freedom-lovers is to cancel your cable or satellite TV subscription.

This deprives propaganda outfits like the aforementioned of the revenue and influence they get from such subscriptions.

It also gives you more money each month to payoff debt, save for retirement or children’s college, or perhaps contribute to pro-liberty, anti-government candidates.

#7 Comment By todd On August 14, 2013 @ 3:58 pm

A conservative, Christian-oriented advocacy group has a new report out blasting the Fox News Channel for what they consider to be its pro-gay bias.

I think it reflects tension between the christian right and the libertarian right.

#8 Comment By EngineerScotty On August 14, 2013 @ 4:09 pm

Given the frequently-salacious nature of Fox’s entertainment offerings (Family Guy, anyone?) this ought to be no surprise. But this has long been Rupert Murdoch’s MO: A mixture of whatever breads and circuses will attract the most eyeballs, coupled with right-wing propaganda designed to promote the interests of the wealthy. This is the man, who when he bought The Sun in the 1960s, told his new managing editor “”I want a tearaway paper with lots of t*ts in it”. And the Sun has indeed delivered plenty of boobs over the years, and is generally read only by boobs as well.

Since Murdoch believes (and he’s mostly correct over the past several decades) that the GOP is more favorably disposed to the plutocracy than the Democrats, Fox News is a nonstop-Republican-lovefest. But–as you note–the only issues Fox seems to really care about are those that do advance the interests of the wealthy; everything else is there to rile up the rubes.

#9 Comment By CK On August 14, 2013 @ 4:14 pm

“now you see that evil will always triumph, because good is dumb.” – Rick Moranis, Lord Dark Helmet, Spaceballs

#10 Comment By steve in ohio On August 14, 2013 @ 4:19 pm

I would agree with you that religious and social conservatives are for the most part ignored by Fox News. (When you see the type of shows on the Fox network, it should come as no surprise.) FN also ignores foreign policy/national defense views other than what neo-conservatives advocate. Last year, Ron Paul received as little coverage on FN as he did on the more liberal networks.

#11 Comment By EliteComminc. On August 14, 2013 @ 4:20 pm

“Am I wrong about this? Maybe I am. Let me know.”

It did not take me long to figure that my freinds at Fox have some peculiar ideas about what conservative programming consists of.

The first night of Red Eye one of their guests was miss Coulter, well I was on it.

But conservative talk, demeanor and behavior it was not. Religious, I am not even sure they are conservatives. And what they sometimes bring to the table as conservatie fair is often loaded with rather offensive commentary about their fellow citizens that is beyond the pale.

It is true they don’t criticize homosexuality much — advertisers and homosexual sympathies if not employees. I cannot fault them for any of this save they they bill themselves as something I am not convinced they are.

Girado rivera, a conservative? You are kidding right? Nothing like bringing up color to prove one’s conservative credentials.

The latest harangue by Mr. O’Reilly about blacks, crime and family. Good grief of the 12,000 or so murders by people who are of darker complexion I am suposed to assign blame to 41 million others? Uhhh excuse me, that twelve thousand and I am exagerrating that number is an act committed by 0,026% of those black citizens — really it’s their fault. I take it all 41 million live in those neighborhoods and somehow foster murder . . .

But a mere eight years ago, Fox was all about expanding Homeland Security, surveillance and now — they are crying foul? What ever happened to responsibility. It is disappointing that the only voice claiming to represent a fair and balanced view, christiuan and conservative values seems all to willing to avoid culpability for their role in a game rigged merely to garner profits.

I have no problem with making money — they are not a charity nor should be — but there seems to be some false advertising here.

But if the only voice that will even offer a trickle of fresh water in a sea of christain bashing, conservative fear mongering is Fox — well, then they have made a smart bet.

I on occassion wath it. But the trayvon Martic commentary was chilling — an unarmed kid lost his life. Those 12 thousand murders are not the fault nor the sole responsibility of black people any more than the number of murders by white are theirs — It is ours. One would think a party behind the eight ball would get it. And behave a little more strategically — shrewd as serpent kind of thing.

#12 Comment By Andrew S. On August 14, 2013 @ 4:22 pm

Fox News has hosted a number of social conservatives over the years: Maggie Gallagher, Brian Brown, Joseph Farah, Matt Barber, Tony Perkins, et al. I think they’ve begun to change their tune on same-sex marriage over the past year or so, but I doubt that will preclude them from inviting social conservatives on in the future.

I can’t say that Christian spirit or practice pervades their programming though. Fulminating about culture war-related topics is one thing, speaking with priests or ministers about, say, pastoral care in rural areas or the state of monastic life in the US is another. I’d be interested in the former, though not the latter – and not because I generally disagree with the traditionalist position, which I do, but because cable news is geared toward confrontation rather than conversation. I’ve never found a shouting match to be particularly enlightening.

#13 Comment By Andrew S. On August 14, 2013 @ 4:27 pm

I should add that I don’t begrudge anyone, whether trad or liberal, their right to fulminate. There’s a reason they call it a culture war. Fulminate away! It’s better than going all Thirty Years War on each other.

#14 Comment By EliteComminc. On August 14, 2013 @ 4:27 pm

“Republican Party, doesn’t it? It mouths all the right pieties to make social and religious conservatives think that it has their interests are heart, ”

As a social conservative, I think I can safely say, we lost our illusions about the Republican party under Reagan, regained some hope with President Bush — but we are keenly aware the Party will sacrifice those principles to win or gain some goal counter to our desires. President Bush, sadly has returned us to a state of discouraged but hopeful.

Homosexual marriage is just the tip of an iceberg.

#15 Comment By Noah172 On August 14, 2013 @ 4:28 pm

FOX is the channel of the secular, corporate, globalist right. FOX entertainment is hardly “family-friendly” Christian fare: let’s not forget that Married… with Children, among other similar offerings, was a FOX production. News Corp. is also the parent of the WSJ.

IOW, FOX is the “Christian” news channel in the way that the Republican Party is the “Christian” party. There is a vast gulf between the proles who provide the ratings and votes and the sheltered, manipulative elite that pays the bills and pulls the puppet strings. Rupert Murdoch is a thrice-married (about to be thrice-divorced) billionaire who supports open borders, free trade, and overseas imperialism (especially on behalf of you-know-who in the Near East), and who promotes a more sexualized culture in his entertainment programs. The GOP is funded by Sheldon Adelson, Paul Singer, the Kochs, Steve Schwartzman, and a long list of other mostly high finance scumbags about whom I could drone on who are much, much more liberal than megachurch Republican primary voters on abortion, homosexuality, immigration (and the National Question more broadly), and so on.

#16 Comment By todd On August 14, 2013 @ 4:40 pm

And please read the report – I’ve never seen that many literal “scare quotes” in one place. It’s like 4-5 per paragraph.

#17 Comment By EliteComminc. On August 14, 2013 @ 4:48 pm

Whether I appreciate Fox News is dependent on who and what I am watching.

Like most programming.

I think the criticisms about the current wh occupant are accurate. – if they are issue oriented on policy.

#18 Comment By Tyro On August 14, 2013 @ 4:50 pm

I think to a large degree, the rank and file activists of the Republican Party are out of touch with the way that their leadership relates to gays. The towns where republicans come from bullied their gays out. Where did they move? Places like New York and Washington, DC, where they might still be republican. While small businessmen of the Republican Party might resent their employees and chafe under the weight of having to give them any benefits, particularly married gay employees claiming marriage benefits, republican congressmen and news producers with gays on their staff like their employees and want them to be eligible for the benefits to which they are entitled. While these staffers work hard to create the news and keep their bosses in office campaigning and serving constituents, the news watchers and voters aren’t good for much outside of adding a fraction of a point to the Nielsen ratings and buying a few lawn signs. So whose side do you think they will come down on? The side of the gays or the side of a few cranky people on the other end of the country?

It is a totally different culture. Our political and media system would not function if our politicians and media executives regarded gays in the same way that rank and file voters and TV watchers regarded gays.

#19 Comment By Sean Scallon On August 14, 2013 @ 4:56 pm

Fox Network and movie studios gin up the moral outrage so Fox News can profit from it. See how this relationship works?

#20 Comment By Edward Hamilton On August 14, 2013 @ 5:07 pm

I’m surprised that no one has posted a link to the recent [2] yet. Fox isn’t substantially different from any other major TV news network. In fact, it’s less likely to support socially conservative viewpoints than NPR!

Remember the [3] about how Newt Gingrich’s marital infidelity made him a better candidate for president?

#21 Comment By Noah172 On August 14, 2013 @ 5:10 pm

I think Fox has a natural audience among religious and social conservatives

Fox has a natural audience among men who want to see attractive, mostly blonde women in their late 30s-early 40s with legs that are still worth flaunting to the rest of the world.

#22 Comment By Jim On August 14, 2013 @ 5:29 pm

“Best move for freedom-lovers is to cancel your cable or satellite TV subscription.

This deprives propaganda outfits like the aforementioned of the revenue and influence they get from such subscriptions.

It also gives you more money each month to payoff debt, save for retirement or children’s college, or perhaps contribute to pro-liberty, anti-government candidates.”

Or to better fortify and arm your compound in a rural, undisclosed location to prepare for the inevitable coming of the new Dark Ages.

Either way.

#23 Comment By collin On August 14, 2013 @ 5:52 pm

I think TDS said it best Fox News mixes Reagan’s DNA with hot blonds. (I always wondered if Fox News is created if The Simpsons was not a hit on Fox. And Bush Sr. thought that show was not family friendly.) Unfortunately, for conservatives Fox’s interest in religion is for simple roaring up the audience that the left is a bunch of extremist Anti-America atheist heckbent on creating the War Of Christmas. Otherwise, there is very little practical religion for the soul.

#24 Comment By Beyng On August 14, 2013 @ 5:54 pm

Tyro,

The towns where republicans come from bullied their gays out. Where did they move? Places like New York and Washington, DC, where they might still be republican. While small businessmen of the Republican Party might resent their employees and chafe under the weight of having to give them any benefits, particularly married gay employees claiming marriage benefits…

I can’t quite put my finger on it, but something about the way you phrase these claims casts you as absurdly out of touch–in general. Nothing you’ve said remotely reflects my experience with small towns (I’m from a small Appalachian hamlet) or my extensive acquaintance with small-town conservatives and small businessmen. For one thing, I’ve honestly never met a small businessman who “resents” his employees.

#25 Comment By William Dalton On August 14, 2013 @ 6:22 pm

“As a social conservative, I think I can safely say, we lost our illusions about the Republican party under Reagan, regained some hope with President Bush — but we are keenly aware the Party will sacrifice those principles to win or gain some goal counter to our desires. President Bush, sadly has returned us to a state of discouraged but hopeful.”

President Bush betrayed his Christian supporters by leading the nation into popular but futile and disastrous wars, futility and disaster which was well predicted in advance by true Christian and conservative publications like TAC. Worst of all is that Bush led the Christian Right down the primrose path, getting it to cheer on the bombing of every village, the evisceration of every provision of the Bill of Rights. The “Christian Right”, those visible spokesmen who have made a mint from the contributions of the faithful watching the news from their homes, have lost all credibility even with most devout Christians, much more so with Americans at large. If you were to write a book about why the debate on “gay marriage” in the United States made such a radical turn in the past decade, the blowback suffered from the presidency of George W. Bush would constitute a large chapter.

#26 Comment By Richard Parker On August 14, 2013 @ 6:51 pm

“Best move for freedom-lovers is to cancel your cable or satellite TV subscription.”

I’m moving that way.

#27 Comment By W.E.B. Dupree On August 14, 2013 @ 7:06 pm

Several years ago, my wife worked on a show with a TV-executive-turned-screenwriter who had formerly worked for the Fox network (the regular broadcast network, not Fox News), and he claimed that he had been present at a meeting when Rupert Murdoch announced his plan to create a cable news channel to be marketed to conservatives, whom he viewed as a very under-served demographic for news in the U.S. (Obviously, Rupert’s money-making instincts were right about that). But, really, I don’t see anything inherently shocking or immoral about that intention; he’s just out to make a buck by giving conservatives a channel more to their liking. Nonetheless, aiming to make money off of some particular group doesn’t necessarily make you that group’s “friend” in any fashion.

#28 Comment By Virgil T. Morant On August 14, 2013 @ 7:11 pm

What Fox News lacks in its coverage of religion, Bill O’Reilly more than makes up for in his erudite discourse on the philosophy called Christianity.

#29 Comment By EliteComminc. On August 14, 2013 @ 7:21 pm

laughing so what existed priot to homosexual marriage was some sort of brok’d dowm Model T Ford? Laughing.

And this drumming out business — huh? I have lived in several small towns, Live in one now and for the most part — people don’t go scrounging around into the sex lives of their neighbors so as to ‘bully them out of town.’

I went to private schools one with a dormitory. I had no idea then nor do I know now who was a homosexual.

#30 Comment By Tyro On August 14, 2013 @ 7:22 pm

My experience with conservatives is that they regard their employees with barely concealed contempt for the twin sins of drawing a salary in the form of money that would otherwise go to themselves and for being an employees rather than a “job creator.” They also HATE legal regulations that will force them to spend money on employees, such as insurance.

Another issue which differentiates them from their conservative brethren in DC and NYC is that they have very fragile egos. A big part of their identity revolves around the idea that they are better than gay people. Politicians and media execs don’t suffer from that insecurity, because they are already important and don’t need to rely on telling themselves “at least I’m not gay!” for social validation.

The rank and file republicans simply have no idea how much of the poltical and media establishment they rely on depends on an integration of gays into civil and professional society. What it gets right down to is who a politician cares about more? His hard working gay chief of staff in his senate office, or the middle manager angry that he has to provide health insurance to his gay employee’s spouse, just like the straight ones?

#31 Comment By Bugg On August 14, 2013 @ 7:42 pm

I wrote a paper in college about Murdoch’s career. Now he almost certainly is conservative in the political sense. By all accounts the New York Post is a cash drain, but something he views as a necessity or it would have closed long ago. But from the beginning he has always been more concerned with making money, which is not a value judgment as much as fact. Fox News accomplishes that because Murdoch and Ailes recognized you had a market that was totally unserved by the MSM.It was a great opportunity.

And the Fox Network has never been remotely about anything conservative, nor should it necessarily be. If you look at the shows his networks produce, you would hardly call “Glee”, “Louie” or “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” as conservative. But these shows make money.

#32 Comment By Public Defender On August 14, 2013 @ 8:31 pm

Fox News is an arm of the Republican Party, which has mostly figured out that gay bashing is no longer good politics. For both Fox and the GOP, courting religious conservatives is merely a means to an end.

[NFR: When has Fox News ever endorsed what you call “gay-bashing”? I think you’re just making nothing but an assumption. Not only have they never done that, as I’ve mentioned in this space before, at the 2002 Catholic bishops’ meeting in Dallas to discuss the sex abuse crisis, Fox specifically instructed its staff on the ground to avoid talking about the homosexual aspect of the situation. Nobody else talked about it either, but someone on that team told me that these were explicit orders from the HQ in New York. — RD]

#33 Comment By JonF On August 14, 2013 @ 8:32 pm

Re: No, with a dose of smallpox, “the Lord’s just wrath” upon those of ours your ancestors wanted to steal their nation from, and who justified it fully as such.

Overkill. Just don’t watch TV news, which deprives the shows of ratings gold and limits what they can charge advertisers.
I can’t think when I last watched on TV. Maybe during election returns?

#34 Comment By Sam M On August 14, 2013 @ 8:39 pm

Stoke ’em up over the War on Christmas and call it a year.

#35 Comment By Larry On August 14, 2013 @ 9:02 pm

@Tyro. Fess up, you’ve never actually talked with a conservative before have you? (I mean a real one, not one that lives inside your imagination.)

#36 Comment By Beyng On August 14, 2013 @ 10:11 pm

Tyro,

Along with Larry, I’m inclined to think you have a rather vivid imagination when it comes to this particular issue. Whether it’s your socioeconomic status, your education, or your family background that has contributed to your parochial impressions of conservatives, I can’t say. But, again, having spent the first 20+ years of my life in a very conservative, Republican section of the South and having associated with many small business owners, your characterizations simply don’t correspond at all with anything I’ve ever experienced.

Again, I’ve yet to meet a small-town business owner who resents his employees. In the vast majority of cases, small business owners in small-town settings are, at the very least, personal friends of their employees and genuinely want the best for them. Heck, I know this because I spent most of my teen years and early 20’s working for just such small businessmen.

Now, you’re absolutely right that these folks do resent new government regulations and mandates that will cost them money. I don’t think you realize how difficult it is to make a living as an owner of, say, a local diner, plant nursery, hardware shop, or printing firm. Due to a combination both of traditionalist moral sentiments (handed down through generations) and a constant struggle to keep the lights on, they do (or would) tend to resent a government dictate the requires them to fund an employee’s gay partner–or, for that matter, to raise wages regardless of economic conditions, etc.

Where you’re wrong, I think, is in attributing this resentment to personal feelings of moral superiority, selfishness, or simple mean-spiritedness. If you owned an ice-cream shop in a small town that, in a good year, allowed you to take home $50,000 for your family of four, you too would likely be annoyed, at the very least, if the federal government now required you to pay an addition (let’s say) $7,000 to fund health insurance for your gay employee’s partner. This is a mandate that would both offend your moral sensibilities (why should I be forced to underwrite the immoral decisions of others? why did I get into business for myself if I can’t protect my conscience?) and cut into your own pay, your business revenues, or both. Imagine if you had two or three gay employees. You would now be skirting close to the federal poverty line and/or thinking about closing up shop for good.

This is the real world of small-town business owners. But not. According to Tyro’s parochial perch, these folks are just backwards, resentful, embittered bigots.

#37 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On August 14, 2013 @ 10:28 pm

Today, I am as conservative as Richard Parker. I don’t even have a converter box, much less a cable connection. When I want to watch anything, its a video or DVD that I picked out.

Fox pioneered some of the raunchiest programming, anti-family and morally deranged, available on the air, although the other networks have all played catch up to preserve their share of the revenue. What’s Christian about it?

#38 Comment By Josh McGee On August 14, 2013 @ 11:14 pm

I probably only watch about 1hr of cable news a month, so this is certainly at best a vague impression, but I would concur with Noah172 where he says, “FOX is the channel of the secular, corporate, globalist right.”

But I doubt I watch enough to have a trustworthy opinion.

Just last week, my wife and I discussed turning off the satellite. The decision was tabled. 🙂

#39 Comment By Tyro On August 14, 2013 @ 11:28 pm

It may surprise you quite a bit, but my personal dislike of Republicans comes from having grown up around them and listening to what they actually say.

In my experience, lots of small town Republicans are pretty much perceive themselves important, except in their own mind. Two things they DID do is probably get a job that provided health insurance and get married and have a family. And what chaps their butt is the fact that someone ELSE whom they don’t think deserve it might also get health insurance and get married, without paying due deference to them and having made different decisions in their own lives. And yes, they regard their employees as “family”, but in the sense that they’re children they like, but ones who cost them money and are sometimes disobedient and don’t know their place.

But what I am trying to get at is that the perspective of Republicans from small towns is quite a bit divorced from the perspective of the Republicans who are the ones creating their media and implementing their policies. The perspective is different– if the Republican “elites” acted in the same way as the Republican rank and file towards gays and employees, the Republican infrastructure that serves the rank and file would not exist.

“Small town Republicans” are a fantasy life sustained only by a more cosmopolitan, wealthier, and gay-friendly political and media infrastructure.

#40 Comment By Mr. Patrick On August 14, 2013 @ 11:38 pm

So what are the War on Christmas, Ten Commandment controversies contrived fresh daily, and Cal Thomas? Chopped liver?

#41 Comment By alcogito On August 15, 2013 @ 1:03 am

I can only watch one news program at a time. Fox news commentary (as opposed to straight news) shows give me two opposing points of view on any given issue. I find that useful and often interesting.

It is clear that many of the commenters above do not watch Fox, and “know” what they know because of what they read on other blogs. Or they interpret what they hear through a mighty strange filter.

#42 Comment By Darth Thulhu On August 15, 2013 @ 2:11 am

Fox has a religion correspondent, Lauren Green, but she’s rarely on air.

This is actually a huge problem for social conservatives, hiding in plain sight. Lauren Green is little short of completely horrible, and is generally deployed as a nonsense-spewing hate-baiter. As you say, she rarely appears, but when she does, she is every bit as ridiculously hackish as Jennifer Rubin, except instead of providing hack commentary drivel for neocons, she provides hack commentary drivel for socons.

Her ambush-interview of Reza Aslan over his book, Zealot, was instantly infamous. It’s just one long line of completely bad-faith gotcha questions.

“Well, so what?” you think, “it’s not like she represents my faith.”

Except, no, really, she does represent your faith, to all those liberals who occasionally tune into Fox News, or posted YouTube clips of Fox News, to “see how social conservatives think”.

She fulfills every lurid dream Dawkins could ever hope for. She is exactly the ignorant and abusive and bad faith interlocutor the “narrow-minded, hateful religious idiot” stereotype would call for. She pretty much single-handedly pissed off so many liberals and bystanders that she made Aslan’s book a bestseller. (Maybe it would have been a bestseller anyway, but my experience is that religious scholarship books normally attract *tiny* audiences. Bart Ehrman makes enough to live on, but early critical Christian scholarship has not gone this completely gangbusters before, in my experience as a bookseller, and that is almost entirely on her.)

People here have been giving Tyro a hard time in the comments recently. Given his comments, I think that hard time was earned … but there is an actual source for those comments. Tyro may not actually know a lot of small town religious conservatives and businesspeople … but Fox News has done a bang-up job making him *think* he has. Liberals watching Lauren Green this past month, likewise, now think they know how “real Christians” regard religious scholarship.

Fox News pretends to speak for y’all, liberals believe they speak for y’all, and generally they continue to be allowed to do so.

#43 Comment By jon s On August 15, 2013 @ 3:07 am

And where exactly does religion belong on the news? The 700 Club has a “news” hour. If you want your reality filtered by religion, go there. I imagine you won’t, because a station whose polestar is religion isn’t very good at providing you the information you need to sound socially coherent in a timely, accurate way.

#44 Comment By Beyng On August 15, 2013 @ 1:03 pm

Tyro,

But what I am trying to get at is that the perspective of Republicans from small towns is quite a bit divorced from the perspective of the Republicans who are the ones creating their media and implementing their policies.

This is so obvious as to be inarguable. But the rest of your “argument” is quite simply off-the-rails delusional. I don’t don’t doubt that you’ve met some conservatives and/or Republicans who correspond to your dismal picture, and these experiences likely contributed to your idiosyncratic construct of the Typical Republican. Or, alternatively, perhaps you’ve met a few gay-bashing jerks who also happened to be Republicans or small business owners.

Your main fallacy seems to be in correlating political/ideological preferences wholesale with personality and character. Whereas most people are able to recognize that Republicans–and Democrats–come in all shapes and character types, you seem to think that “Republican” labels not only a voting preference or merely political identity, but also a whole way of seeing, being, and acting in the world (mostly ways of seeing, being, and acting that deserve condemnation). While, again, there are certainly Republicans who match your description–and while certain of these negative predilections could find confirmation in certain components of the Republican platform–there’s simply no evidence that your anecdotal fantasy conforms to statistical reality (Haidt notwithstanding–at the very least, his account of conservatism=moral purity doesn’t depict all conservatives thereby as selfish jerks).

I don’t tend to get offended on the internet, but crips, Tyro. As a guy who grew up in a politically diverse family that happened to include a fair number of Republican small business owners, your remarks are offensive. And I notice your politics=personality paradigm in a lot of your comments on this blog. It doesn’t hold water. How would you like it if I characterized all Democrats/progressives by reference to the handful of elitist, faux-enlightened, rural-bashing white hippies in my current community? I mean, naturally, rank-and-file Democrats are just assholes who resent people who don’t want to pay more taxes, right?

#45 Comment By Kristopher Pierce On August 15, 2013 @ 9:21 pm

The first time I realized that Fox News isn’t really a friend to Christian conservatives was when I visited their website and saw some of the articles and ads that were on there. There was nothing on there that would make one think this was a news organization that is friendly to Christians or other social conservatives.

I used to watch “Huckabee” on Fox News, but other than that I never felt like there was anything for me there. There are people I know from my church that watch Fox News and think that it represents them well. But that is because they have wrongly equated the Republican/neo-conservative worldview with a Christian worldview(or cosmology, if you prefer). They are not the same.

I don’t listen to conservative talk radio either(except for a couple of social conservative programs like “Focus on the Family” and “Point of View”). I tend to listen to a lot of NPR. I know that NPR is biased too, but at least they are not selling themselves as the go-to place for Christian conservatives to get their news like some want to believe that Fox News is.

#46 Comment By forked tongue On August 16, 2013 @ 10:25 am

Well–they defend Christmas from the War On It.