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The Ideological Corruption Of Scholarship

I heard from an academic friend yesterday who is extremely discouraged. I invited him to write about his experience for this blog, and I imagine he will. For now, I can tell you this. He is a young scholar working in a highly specialized branch of the humanities, one that requires an immense amount of learning. He proposed a paper for two separate forums within his discipline, and was turned down. He’s very, very good in his field, and is used to having his papers accepted, and winning accolades. This was unusual, but it is of course quite possible that his papers weren’t as good as the others.

What set him off, though, was his recognition that he probably wasn’t going to get accepted anyway, whatever the quality of his work, because the gatekeepers aren’t interested in the old-fashioned kind of scholarship that he does. Last year, the papers accepted in these two different forums were not about seriously scholarly topics, but about the kind of shallow takes on politically approved topics. My friend writes that this was “the final nail in the coffin” for him, the one that reveals that he has no place in the academy. He said he is glad to have learned this before becoming dependent on a university paycheck, but it grieves him to have devoted so much of his life to mastering his subject only to arrive at the end of his studies to find that his field has become as politicized as other humanities fields. He writes:

We’re in dangerous and uncharted waters, where the grievance studies industry has cross-pollinated the “more and more about less and less” phenomenon, yielding institutional incentives to reward extreme myopia as evidence of excellence.

It is not enough to be a disinterested scholar. (I’m old enough to remember when there was no other kind.) You have to be committed to the Party and its line. A reader the other day sent in a link to a form at the University of California San Diego [1] in which applicants for faculty positions there must write, as part of their application, a lengthy statement discussing their views on diversity, and the work they have done to propagate it. Quote:

The Contributions to Diversity Statement should describe your past efforts, as well as future plans to advance diversity, equity and inclusion. It should also demonstrate an understanding of the barriers facing women and underrepresented minorities and of UC San Diego’s mission to meet the educational needs of our diverse student population. Some faculty candidates may not have substantial past activities. If such cases, we recommend focusing on future plans in your statement.

However, please note that a demonstrated record of past effort is given greater weight than articulating awareness of barriers or stating future plans. A more developed and substantial plan is expected for senior candidates.

Got that? It doesn’t matter how good your research is, or how high your ratings as a classroom instructor are. What matters is how you feel about the Revolution, and what things you have done, or plan to do, to serve the Party.

This is not a statement from a private university or a religious college, but from a major state university. Brilliant scholars who have no interest in working for the Party will be left out, and middling hacks who know how to advocate for the Party line within an ideologized system will advance.

By the way, it’s not simply a matter of ideologically capturing areas of scholarship. The SJWs are now marching through student affairs offices. Patricia Daugherty writes at The Federalist about the annual convention of ACPA [2], the American College Personnel Association: College Student Educators International. This is the professional organization for campus administrators who oversee student life. She recently retired from a long career in the field, and says she always looked forward to going to this convention. Times. Have. Changed. Check out her report:

When the pre-conference advertising trumpeted the “Strategic Imperative for Racial Justice and Decolonization” theme, I had a feeling things had changed mightily since I last attended a national meeting. We were provided “talking points” that included such statements as “Racism and colonization are real, present, enduring, intersectional, and systemic forms of oppression,” and “Advocacy and social change require us to work to dismantle racism and colonization in higher education.”

The conference website highlighted blog posts with such titles as “Racial Justice & Decolonization Can’t Happen Without Disrupting Monoracism,” “The Costs of Avoiding Discomfort: Addressing White Supremacy in Student Affairs,” and “White People Owning Our Whiteness & Resistance.”

Daugherty outlines more of the P.C. nuthatchery she encountered, but said that this is a signal of something more serious:

I write this not (only) to make fun of what I observed. I have many wonderful friends who still work in student affairs, and they’re good at their jobs. But I am sounding an alarm for average, everyday people who need to know more about what is feeding the campus discord and upheaval that we see so often in the news.

“Those liberal professors” share the blame for the sanctimonious silliness, but the administrators at this conference often have much more personal contact with students. They advise student government, supervise residence-hall staff, and oversee the student code of conduct and “free speech” policies. They include those who recently graduated from their master’s programs, regularly attend student affairs conferences, and soak up the social-justice messages.

When I came along in my student affairs master’s and doctoral programs, we were taught about psychology and normal maturational issues of 18- to-22-year-olds. We learned how to be objective counselors, supervise and develop groups, and teach leadership skills to young adults who would one day lead our communities and nation. We supported all of our students—black, white, Asian, Hispanic, Native American, gay, straight, and international. We tried to create environments where everyone could succeed, and when conflicts arose, we helped students learn how to solve their problems.

Now, however, college students are surrounded by adults who live and breathe an extreme political ideology. No more judging people by the content of their character instead of the color of their skin. No more encouraging everyone to come together around their commonalities rather than focusing on every possible difference. No more celebrating the gifts of all people. It was disheartening to see and hear so much stereotyping from people who pride themselves on their inclusiveness.

Here’s something from the ACPA Strategic Imperative For Racial Justice And Decolonization webpage — talking points that they advise members to use to frame their thinking about their jobs:

Daugherty adds:

This type of dogmatism and tunnel vision is profoundly unhealthy for our students. Young people are more fragile now than they have ever been, and I’m afraid student affairs is playing a major role in the angst. The political self-absorption I saw promotes not emotional growth and resilience but rather distrust, anxiety, and victimhood. College students need mentors who are more concerned with their developing competence and strength than with which pronouns they use.

Read the whole thing.  [2]

So: the militant left is destroying humanities scholarship, and working to dismantle university communities (by turning them into hotbeds of anxiety and mutual suspicion).

The backlash and/or the collapse can’t happen fast enough. What my discouraged scholar friend points out, though, is that the loss to actual scholarship from this is profound. Consider how little of lasting value came out of the non-STEM faculties at universities behind the Iron Curtain. Scholarship in those nations went into deep freeze for decades. No totalitarian government is forcing this on our professors and institutions of higher learning. They are choosing this themselves.

You really shouldn’t be so myopic as to think that what happens on campus stays on campus. These universities are training the leaders in politics, business, academia, and so forth, of tomorrow. The poisonous seeds planted here will bear bitter fruit later. For example, look at what George Washington University is doing this week in student life: [3]

Just four days after Easter, George Washington University will host a training session for students and faculty that teaches that Christians — especially white ones — “receive unmerited perks from institutions and systems all across our country.”

The April 5 diversity workshop is titled “Christian Privilege: But Our Founding Fathers Were All Christian, Right?!”

Hosted by the university’s Multicultural Student Services Center, the event will teach that Christians enjoy a privileged, easier life than their non-Christian counterparts, and that Christians possess “built-in advantages” today, according [4] to its online description.

The workshop will also discuss how Christians receive “unmerited perks from institutions and systems all across our country.”

The “Christian Privilege” workshop is one of 15 “free training opportunities” offered through the center to “equip students and staff with the necessary skills to promote diversity and inclusion in the different environments,” according [5] to its website.

Other workshops offered through the center focus on “heterosexual privilege,” “cisgender privilege,” “abled-bodied privilege,” “socio-economic privilege,” “unconscious bias,” and more.

These people are manufacturing hate. Whether they know it or not, they’re trying to turn the United States into the former Yugoslavia.

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122 Comments To "The Ideological Corruption Of Scholarship"

#1 Comment By Rob G On April 4, 2018 @ 8:14 am

This conversation about fascism with Bad Religion reminds me of the old “Young Ones” episode where the boys’ house is surrounded by a fascist mob. Unable to decide what to do, one of them suggests they call the police. “We can’t do that!” yells Rick. “The police are fascists too!”

#2 Comment By Franklin Evans On April 4, 2018 @ 9:42 am

Elijah,

I can only reply from my perspective of hearing the stories my parents told me, both having lived during a significant portion of Tito’s “revolution”, my father having been an officer in the Serbian Army and an in absentia convicted war criminal — later given “amnesty” — during the early days of Tito’s consolidation of power.

In short, there were plenty of monsters on both sides. We see the track record of the ones in power in the history books.

Item: my mother told of a young man who was courting her, who one day proudly told her that he had “turned in” his parents to the Communist revolution. Later, Croatia had the Nazi-puppet regime Ustasi.

Item: partisan prisoners in military prisons were routinely tortured, and often beheaded as the preferred form of execution.

Item: my father’s equipment consisted of a Mauser rifle, Swiss alpine gear, U.S. Army ammunition pack, and a British stiletto. Stories of the army collaborating with the Nazis fail to report that they often traded weak or false intelligence for food and ammunition.

The Serbs tradition of personal violence stretches back centuries. Their most revered battle — Kosovo — was a defeat.

Croats and Serbs mutual hatred, based almost entirely on religion, remains the first thing visitors must know. I plan to make an extended visit at some point, and intend to be conversant in Serbian because I’ll be spending at least half the time in Serbia, and I know to not use it in Croatia.

I don’t care that Hitler made the trains run on time — something he had little cause to claim — or that Mussolini put a chicken in every pot or some such thing. I know what two people witnessed and experienced on the ground during the first Yugoslav civil war. You are welcome to apply grains of salt.

In case you care to know: my mother was born in Zagreb in 1924, my father was born in Cetinje in 1916.

#3 Comment By Pat On April 4, 2018 @ 10:21 am

How many colleges and universities would go under entirely if they could not recruit and retain students from previously underrepresented demographics?

Folks who want universities to act as if their customer base hasn’t changed since 1950 are not going to have any luck. Back in the 50’s, more ‘conservative’ ideologies just happened to match the institutions’ fiscal priorities, and now they don’t. In another 50 years the current social justice supporters may well be singing the same song of woe.

Meanwhile, the institutions will hire for people who can help them attract and teach the student body that will keep them in business. Like waves in the ocean, the shifting student body makes different groups of scholars bob up and down in their ideological boats, all of them certain that the moment they’re up represents society on the right track and the moment they’re down represents a catastrophic decline.

#4 Comment By pjsmoov On April 4, 2018 @ 12:04 pm

Bad Religion: “So you’re telling me…” See the Peterson/Newman interview. You’re on your way to becoming a meme. BTW, you’re assigning victim status or marginalized status to all sorts of groups. Add them all up and they might be a majority. I think I may have even been so elevated in your view for a spell. I qualified for food stamps in college so I guess I was once one with the marginalized communities of America. Awesome. Well, I generally felt fine and fit in and didn’t fall for the b.s. some profs pushed. Anyway, thanks for all of your efforts on behalf of marginalized communities I apparently once belonged to.

I’m wondering if you really believe what you write or whether you’re just having a bit of fun.

#5 Comment By BadReligion On April 4, 2018 @ 12:12 pm

“You know, I’d think a true believer like you would proudly stand by threatening people he considered to be fascists. Not sure why you’re in a state of denial all of the suddent. It certainly isn’t evidence of bravery.”

I didn’t do that, nor did I ever say that I considered Pelosi a fascist. They sometimes utter the same phrases.

“You obviously had no problem justifying or making excuses for those in your movement who attacked reporters, beat up unarmed women, killed a police horse, and attempted to commit murder in at least one instance.”

I’ve already explained this to you repeatedly.

“I’d be happy to hear about the situation in Australia, Japan and Singapore.”

I’m not sure, but all three countries have certain delicate (or worse) issues around ethnicity/migration, among other things.

“I’m sorry, can you find anywhere a conservative students’ organization demanding days off from class to deal with their mental health issues?
I posit SJWs suffer from far more mental health issues than other students. Because they’re so empathetic and it’s all so overwhelming, you know.”

I posit that conservative groups are less sympathetic to such issues, due to their stricter gender roles (“Man up/suck it up/etc.”) and tendency to dismiss mental health assistance in favor of, for just one example, religion. Surely you’ve seen this sort of thing, and unfortunately it isn’t limited to conservatives.

“I absolutely urge Howard to prevent cops from carrying weapons, and let’s see what happens. Because there have been so many successful communities and societies without police.”

As a matter of fact, while it’s also problematic, there are very different ways to approach security, as can be seen in the myriad links I sent you (besides the TruthOut piece). While this system is also problematic, there was a long time in the history of the Northern US when elected constables and sheriffs were very accountable to the local population- much more so than the police who arrived later.

“http://inthesetimes.com/working/entry/17505/police_and_poor_people”

“Many of the experiences of perceived racism (as opposed to explicit racism) DO fit that pattern.”

How do you know?

“It’s like your largely imaginary fascists. There really are a small number of fascists in the USA and there really is anti-black racism in this country.”

So the fascists of Europe and Asia should not have been smashed in their earliest phases, when they were few?

“However there’s also a lot of exaggeration of incidences that DON’T represent those things to justify revolutionary zeal amongst middle class college students (and sometimes faculty and admin) who in reality are part of the power structure themselves.”

Thankfully the revolutionary zeal these days extends well beyond middle class students/faculty/admin. One doesn’t want to end up like the Narodniks.

‘“This conversation about fascism with Bad Religion reminds me of the old “Young Ones” episode where the boys’ house is surrounded by a fascist mob. Unable to decide what to do, one of them suggests they call the police. “We can’t do that!” yells Rick. “The police are fascists too!”’

Indeed. The police have been working with para-state and outright fascist groups lately, as usual.
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#6 Comment By Jesse On April 4, 2018 @ 12:46 pm

“is there really a the plague of white people who want to touch someone’s hair???”

Speaking personally, but every black person I know who wears their hair ‘naturally’ has multiple stories about non-black people touching their hair without asking for permission

#7 Comment By MM On April 4, 2018 @ 12:49 pm

BadReligion: “I’ve already explained this to you repeatedly.”

Yes, but that doesn’t make your explanations believable, credible, or moral in any way.

But my original point remains unchallenged by you. Anyone who would defend David Campbell and Eric Clanton is totally unqualified to make arguments in favor of “safe spaces” and “social justice”.

Trafficking in actual violence and rejecting legal justice, as you’ve done time and again, makes you a terrible advocate for these students. A terrible advocate indeed.

#8 Comment By kgasmart On April 4, 2018 @ 1:45 pm

I posit that conservative groups are less sympathetic to such issues, due to their stricter gender roles (“Man up/suck it up/etc.”) and tendency to dismiss mental health assistance in favor of, for just one example, religion. Surely you’ve seen this sort of thing, and unfortunately it isn’t limited to conservatives.

I have, and deem it far superior to the “woe is me for I care so much!” nonsense that emanates from the left.

There was a long time in the history of the Northern US when elected constables and sheriffs were very accountable to the local population- much more so than the police who arrived later.

Perhaps – but correct me if I’m wrong, I’m pretty sure they carried guns, as did most of the folks in the north/west who knew they couldn’t count on the law arriving in time.

#9 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On April 4, 2018 @ 4:46 pm

“So, what’s so crazy about attempts to make campuses safe and accommodating for marginalized communities?”

Depends on the definition of marginalized communities, and then, we need to have a conversation about what “safe” means. Then we could begin to attempt to answer your question.

but I’m not in a position to judge.

You and the Pope, apparently. The truth is, anyone with the slightest sense of responsibility must judge, all the time.

#10 Comment By VikingLS On April 4, 2018 @ 8:05 pm

““Many of the experiences of perceived racism (as opposed to explicit racism) DO fit that pattern.”

How do you know?”

The same reason you know this is true as well. I listened to way too many of those stories myself. Look, you asked if we had listened to the stories based on the presumption we hadn’t. Sorry, but I have. Most of them simply come down to, “someone was rude to me! It was because of racism! I’m see how repressive this society is!”

One of the WORST things that can happen to these movements is if people actually listen to them.

“So the fascists of Europe and Asia should not have been smashed in their earliest phases, when they were few?”

No, and that doesn’t follow from my comment and you KNOW that it doesn’t. There isn’t a rising tide of fascism in the USA. Whenever you’re challenged on this you end up wildly exaggerating, or digging up some obscure incident in some northwest backwater nobody but you ever heard of. It’s like people who talk about the USA being taken over by radical Muslims. Are there radical Muslims in the USA. Yes. Might they be a growing threat? Maybe, but they’d have to grow at a thousand times the current rate, exponentially, for them to be an existential threat. Same with the supposed fascist threat.

ANTIFA is a medicine far far worse than the disease. Everybody but you and the New York Times seems to get that.

#11 Comment By VikingLS On April 4, 2018 @ 8:09 pm

That should have been:

“No that isn’t what I’m saying, and that doesn’t follow from my comment and you KNOW that it doesn’t.”

That said, it wasn’t from lack of enthusiasm from left wing rivals that the fascists in Europe rose. If anything communists and anarchists HELPED fascists considerably because they were so frightening as an alternative.

I mean what do you think those black outfits of yours do OTHER than intimidate? Sure you can say they scare the bad guys, but genius, they scare the innocent too.

#12 Comment By VikingLS On April 4, 2018 @ 8:28 pm

“Trafficking in actual violence and rejecting legal justice, as you’ve done time and again, makes you a terrible advocate for these students. A terrible advocate indeed.”

Maybe he’s bipolar?

He seems to go back and forth on these things so dramatically, one minute saying “of COURSE he doesn’t support violence against innocent bystanders” and then the next suggesting that any criticism of ANTIFA’s tactics is akin to being apathetic about the Nazis.

#13 Comment By Rob G On April 5, 2018 @ 6:54 am

‘“The police are fascists too!”’

‘Indeed. The police have been working with para-state and outright fascist groups lately, as usual.’

Right, and since the police work closely with both EMT’s and the fire departments one obviously cannot be sure about them either. So, what, when your house is on fire or your neighbor has a heart attack you call Antifa?

Somebody’s elevator isn’t going to the top floor here, methinks.

#14 Comment By MM On April 5, 2018 @ 10:31 am

Viking: “Maybe he’s bipolar?”

Well, he’s certainly not self-aware of how the excuses he makes comes across.

And he’s a very bad liar. I’ve never come across someone who’ll defend unprovoked attacks on individuals not doing anything wrong as “self-defense”.

When I cited the California law covering self-defense, and how no jury would ever be allowed to consider such a legal defense, he basically said, “Who cares about the law?”

I still maintain that he never got his GED…

#15 Comment By BadReligion On April 5, 2018 @ 8:08 pm

“I’m wondering if you really believe what you write or whether you’re just having a bit of fun.”

On the contrary; I wonder that about you and others.

“Yes, but that doesn’t make your explanations believable, credible, or moral in any way.”

What more do you need? You gave me a quote from Pelosi, and asked me if fascists say the same thing. I said that they do. That does not mean that I consider Pelosi a fascist, let alone that I threatened her. I told you that I disagree with some of what’s been done to reporters, and that nearly every anti-fascist is strongly opposed to harming a police horse. I also stress that someone marching with fascists is not exactly an “innocent civilian.”

“I have, and deem it far superior to the “woe is me for I care so much!” nonsense that emanates from the left.”

Advocacy for greater mental health resources is intended to help the entire student body with serious issues that most of the time are not political at all. Again, you’re assuming facts not in evidence.

“I’m pretty sure they carried guns, as did most of the folks in the north/west who knew they couldn’t count on the law arriving in time.”

Like I said, it’s still problematic.

“You and the Pope, apparently. The truth is, anyone with the slightest sense of responsibility must judge, all the time.”

I’m not in a position to tell marginalized people (as groups) that they’re not justified in feeling oppressed in some way. I don’t think that you are, either. I’m white, male, cisgender, heterosexual, born in the US, from a middle-class background, among other things. Not all of those things might apply to you, but the point is, do you really think that you understand their experiences better than they do, by and large?

“There isn’t a rising tide of fascism in the USA.”

I am gobsmacked by this. “How did we let hate win?” was a slogan on some signs at the protests of the inauguration. Trump’s campaign was explicitly based upon xenophobia and ethnic nationalism. Among many other things, see his statements about Judge Curiel, and Trump’s long history of racist words and deeds. Scapegoating powerless minorities (Muslims!) is a key plank in his administration. He’s overflowing in belligerent misogyny and anti-intellectualism (tariffs, denial of climate change, etc.). He selected a Vice President who is unambiguously homophobic and transphobic, and an Attorney General with a very racially problematic past. Let’s also not forget Steve Bannon and Stephen Miller’s ascent to positions of influence.

The Trump campaign and presidency earned the qualified support of fascist (not always racist)American movements, who had been brewing/percolating/etc. for years. Now, unlike the anti-fascists, the fascists have been killing people.

“ANTIFA is a medicine far far worse than the disease. Everybody but you and the New York Times seems to get that.”

What does the NYT have to do with this?

“I mean what do you think those black outfits of yours do OTHER than intimidate? Sure you can say they scare the bad guys, but genius, they scare the innocent too.”

Actually, if you look at the majority of the recent battles, most of the antifa aren’t dressed like that.

“Right, and since the police work closely with both EMT’s and the fire departments one obviously cannot be sure about them either. So, what, when your house is on fire or your neighbor has a heart attack you call Antifa?”

You’re being ridiculous. Click the links.

“I’ve never come across someone who’ll defend unprovoked attacks on individuals not doing anything wrong as “self-defense”. When I cited the California law covering self-defense, and how no jury would ever be allowed to consider such a legal defense, he basically said, “Who cares about the law?””

I said that it looked to me like self-defense, inasmuch as that event consisted of a crowd of Nazis and other fascists, but even if it doesn’t qualify under the State’s definition, there is always such a thing as jury nullification.

“I still maintain that he never got his GED…”

I got my diploma, and lots more than that. I’m not sure what that has to do with anything, but it’s the truth.

#16 Comment By MM On April 6, 2018 @ 1:45 am

BadReligion: “What more do you need?”

Do you unequivocably condemn the following acts committed by members of your movement, specifically, as illegal, immoral, and unjustified?

– Unidentified Antifa members: Assault with pepper spray against an unarmed female Trump supporter in Berkeley, CA in Feb. 2017
– Antifa member Eric Clanton: Assault with a deadly weapon against multiple unarmed individuals in Berkeley, CA in Apr. 2017
– Antifa member Lisa Simon: Assault with a deadly weapon against a police horse in Harrisburg, PA in Jun. 2017
– Antifa member Richard Losey: Assault with hate crime enhancement against an unarmed black male Trump supporter in Laguna Beach, CA in Aug. 2017
– Unidentified Antifa members: Assault against a male reporter in Richmond, VA and a female reporter in Charlottesville, VA in Aug. 2017
– Antifa member David Campbell: Attempted murder of an unarmed white male Trump supporter in New York City in Jan. 2018

A straight YES or NO, please. I will take any hint of equivocation as a NO to the entire question.

Thanks!

#17 Comment By Rob G On April 6, 2018 @ 6:31 am

“There isn’t a rising tide of fascism in the USA.”

There is if you define fascism as anything to the right of the Huffington Post.

#18 Comment By MM On April 6, 2018 @ 11:33 am

BadReligion: “I got my diploma, and lots more than that.”

Why don’t you prove that, then?

#19 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On April 6, 2018 @ 12:44 pm

Some of the flak directed against BadReligion is beginning to remind me of the some of the more outlandish liberal dismissals of Noah172. I disagree with both quite often, but we can make a good case with facts and evidence. There is no need to indulge in broad insinuations and contrived characterizations.

#20 Comment By MM On April 6, 2018 @ 3:38 pm

BadReligion: “There is always such a thing as jury nullification.”

Well, that is the last refuge of a desperate criminal. But for an amateur defense attorney to argue this in court, there has to be a factual basis.

What elements of assault, assault with a deadly weapon, and attempted murder do you cite as reasons for nullifying the law?

What specifics of the cases I detailed above do you cite as reasons for nullifying justice for the victims of your crimes?

Facts, please. I’m not interested in unqualified legal opinions.

#21 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On April 8, 2018 @ 7:49 pm

“How did we let hate win?” was a slogan on some signs at the protests of the inauguration.

That’s an easy one to answer. By insisting on running the unpopular, dubious, distrusted, Hillary Clinton, who had already been rejected once and should have known better than to try again just because she was in love with the image of herself being president.

None of which proves that there is, or is not, fascism in power, or a rising tide of fascism in the United States. The word “fascism” has been so broadly used that without agreeing on a rigorous definition we can’t have a meaningful debate. All racism is not fascism, and all fascism is not racist. Plug in any number of other evils.

I’m not even sure its valid to call the Nazi Party fascist, although I am sure that it is valid to call the Fascist Party fascist. Military juntas often qualify, but some military coups have been explicitly socialist in ideology. If any plutocratic economy governed by an unaccountable bureaucracy and dominated by a military-industrial complex is fascist… well then, we’ve been living under fascism for quite some time, albeit without the lurid empirics of Jack London’s The Iron Heel.

#22 Comment By MM On April 9, 2018 @ 5:03 pm

Jenkins: “None of which proves that there is, or is not, fascism in power, or a rising tide of fascism in the United States.”

In Antifa-speak, that would be violent hates crimes by whites committed against non-whites.

Using the FBI’s UCR data on just that phenomenon, there is no rising tide whatsoever. In fact, such attacks, including murder and manslaughter, have been trending down for 10 years, and went down in 2016, the most recent year available, and the year Trump supposedly let white supremacy off its chain…