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Sarah’s haunted face stares out under a red Islamic head-dress in her wedding photo. Beside her, guests eat cake while celebrating the marriage, conducted by the local mosque’s imam at a terraced house in the Home Counties.

Yet Sarah is not a willing bride. She is being made to marry a member of the gang that effectively forced her into sex slavery after abducting her in a Tesco car park in the English suburbs one autumn afternoon. Her captivity lasted for 12 long years.

Within minutes of her wedding picture being taken, the white English girl was pushed upstairs into a bedroom and raped by her new husband, a man she had set eyes on for the first time only half an hour earlier.

It was just one of the unimaginable torments Sarah endured after she was kidnapped as a shy 15-year-old. She had never had a boyfriend. She was studying at college, hoping to train as a midwife.

Sarah’s story is described by House of Lords crossbencher Baroness Caroline Cox, who has taken up her case, as the most serious example of sex grooming yet to emerge in this country.

‘I know Sarah and her family,’ explains Baroness Cox. ‘Every sex grooming case is terrible. But the length and cruelty of her abduction make it the worst I have known.’

Sarah’s abuse went on while her distraught family’s pleas for help were, they insist, ignored by a police force that refused even to list her as missing.

Her family were forced to keep up the search for her on their own after she failed to return from Tesco.

‘The police kept saying leave it a few days, she’ll come back,’ says her mother Janet today. ‘But she never did.’

Sarah was snatched five years before the scandal of sexual abuse of young white girls by street grooming gangs was first revealed in 2010, after investigations by the Daily Mail and later by the Government.

The all-pervading culture of political correctness at the time of her abduction meant the gangs, often of Pakistani-British heritage, were ignored by police forces that were terrified of being called racist if they pursued them.

Read the whole thing. But don’t tell anybody about it, not if you live in South Yorkshire. You might be reported to the police.