Ricardo Lockette, a former player with the Seattle Seahawks, went to give an inspirational talk to a Seattle-area high school. I bet he doesn’t make that mistake again. Excerpts:

Intending to be motivational, former Seahawk Ricardo Lockette angered a group of Garfield High School students at an assembly Tuesday with remarks urging men to stand up for women.

The speech, part of the school’s push to promote leadership among student athletes, caused a group to stand up and attempt a walkout after what some called sexist remarks by the former professional athlete.

“He was pretty much saying that women need men in their lives to be successful,” said Julia Olson, a junior volleyball player in the audience who protested his remarks.

That response followed the former receiver’s asking the students how they expect their dads to respond to someone harassing their mothers, emphasizing that the male figures should speak up. Olson then challenged Lockette, saying, “Why can’t women stand up for themselves?”

Some in the crowd cheered her rebuttal. Lockette said he respected her leadership, and then he responded with what he said he would tell relatives:

“Even though you can handle your own, but as men — men stand up; men take the challenge; men take the lead; men take the head,” Lockette told the crowd, according to audio obtained by KOMO News.

More:

[Julia Olson] added the comments contradicted what she was learning in classes. “I didn’t feel comfortable staying. I didn’t want to listen to really anything else that was going to be said.”

Lockette continued speaking after the walkout, saying the goal of the appearance was to instill confidence and motivation. Reached by phone Tuesday evening, he said overall the speech “went great,” and by the end, “we agreed at what we’re saying.”

“We all need each other,” said Lockette, who retired from the NFL in May after suffering a life-threatening neck injury during a game last November in Dallas. “At the end of the day, it was all about helping each other.”

Read the whole thing.

Said Surly Temple, the (liberal) Seattle reader who sent me this story:

This makes me SO angry! I hope you are moved to blog about it.  The Seattle Seahawks  make a genuine effort to be positive leaders in the community.  This retired player took his own time to visit a HIGH SCHOOL and speak to the students.

Do you think the students listened respectfully to him–an African American professional athlete who has conducted himself with grace and courage in the face of a devastating injury that almost ended his life and did end his career?  Kids usually do respond positively to pro athletes. You do think they were respectful of this honored guest? Well, you’d be wrong.

You can agree or disagree with his remarks, but these students were incapable of hearing an argument and then evaluating it and being civil if they disagreed with his position.

Money quote to a female student who challenged him, from Mr. Lockette, the vile sexist:

“It’s totally great to be confident, but you can’t do everything by yourself. If this room, if this school, was totally all women … what would you do? You can’t run, run your world with just women; it’s impossible — it’s impossible. Just like if it was all men,” he said, “we wouldn’t be able to do it. We need each other.”

“We need each other.”  Fighting words apparently.

You can hear the audio of the speech here. Lockette is graceful under fire.

A couple of area radio hosts parsed the words of this professional football player, and found that he is devoid of Ciceronian eloquence and severely lacks feminist wokeness. They suggest that he have others read his remarks before going to talk to high school students again. Because saying that men have an obligation to treat women well and defend them is monstrous.

Those radio talkers are nitwits and Julia Olson is a spoiled brat. That young Social Justice Warrior is going to go to college, and complain incessantly about sexism and the need for safe spaces, and make a total nuisance of herself in the process of getting a useless women’s studies degree, which will teach her little more than how to be offended.

The day is going to come when Julia Olson wishes she had a strong, self-sacrificing husband who lived by the code that Ricardo Lockette spoke of in that assembly. You watch.

UPDATE: Reader evw writes:

According to Julia Olson, “Women should be empowered to be on your own.”

Let’s pretend that’s not ridiculously naive and for the sake of argument, agree. First, though, you have to get him off you, Julia.

Maybe Julia Olson has never been pinned to the ground by a much stronger, drunk man, like I have.

Maybe she doesn’t know the sheer terror when she realizes she can’t get herself free, her female friend isn’t strong enough to help either, and he’s getting her clothes off, like I do.

Maybe she’s never experienced the utter relief when an even bigger MAN comes to her rescue and, with difficulty, drags the guy off her, like I have.

Once off, I DID handle things on my own, warning everyone I knew, and refusing to have anything to do with him till the year ended. And it didn’t ruin my life and I DID feel empowered by how I handled it.

But that only happened because first a man was willing to use his strength to help me.

Sometimes I guess ignorance IS bliss.

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