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My Night At Vaclav Benda’s

If you read The Benedict Option [1], you’ll know the name of Vaclav Benda (d. 1999). He was a Czech mathematician, Roman Catholic, and leading anti-communist dissident. He went to jail along with Vaclav Havel. You can read more about him in this interview I published here last week with Flagg Taylor, an American academic who edited a collection of Benda’s essays, titled The Long Night of the Watchman. [2]

From The Benedict Option, here’s a passage about him:

“A better system will not automatically ensure a better life,” [Vaclav] Havel goes on. “In fact the opposite is true: only by creating a better life can a better system be developed.”

The answer, then, is to create and support “parallel structures” in which the truth can be lived in community. Isn’t this a form of escapism, a retreat into a ghetto? Not at all, says Havel; a countercultural community that abdicated its responsibility to reach out to help others would end up being a “more sophisticated version of ‘living within a lie.'”

A good example of what this better life could look like comes from the late mathematician and dissident Václav Benda. A faithful Catholic, Benda believed that Communism maintained its iron grip on the people by isolating them, fragmenting their natural social bonds. The Czech regime severely punished the Catholic Church, driving many believers to privatize their faith, retreating behind the walls of their homes so as not to attract attention from the authorities.

Benda’s distinct contribution to the dissident movement was the idea of a “parallel polis” – a separate but porous society existing alongside the official Communist order. Says Flagg Taylor, an American political philosopher and expert on Czech dissident movements, “Benda’s point was that dissidents couldn’t simply protest the Communist government, but had to support positive engagement with the world.”

At serious risk to himself and his family (he and his wife had six children), Benda rejected ghettoization. He saw no possibility for collaboration with the Communists, but he also rejected quietism, considering it a failure to display proper Christian concern for justice, charity, and bearing evangelical witness to Christ in the public square. For Benda, Havel’s injunction to “live in truth” could only mean one thing: to live as a Christian in community.

Benda did not advocate retreat to a Christian ghetto. He insisted that the parallel polis must understand itself as fighting for “the preservation or the renewal of the national community in the widest sense of the word – along with the defense of all the values, institutions, and material conditions to which the existence of such a community is bound.

change_me

[Benda wrote:] I personally think that a no less effective, exceptionally painful, and in the short term practically irreparable way of eliminating the human race or individual nations would be a decline into barbarism, the abandonment of reason and learning, the loss of traditions and memory. The ruling regime – partly intentionally, partly thanks to its essentially nihilistic nature – has done everything it can to achieve that goal. The aim of independent citizens’ movements that try to create a parallel polis must be precisely the opposite: we must not be discouraged by previous failures, and we must consider the area of schooling and education as one of our main priorities.

From this perspective, the parallel polis is not about building a gated community for Christians but rather about establishing (or reestablishing) common practices and common institutions that can reverse the isolation and fragmentation of contemporary society. (In this we hear Brother Ignatius of Norcia’s call to have “borders ” – formal lines behind which we live to nurture our faith and culture – but to “push outwards, infinitely.” ) Benda wrote that the parallel polis’s ultimate political goals are “to return to truth and justice, to a meaningful order of values, [and] to value once more the inalienability of human dignity and the necessity for a sense of human community in mutual love and responsibility.”

In other words, dissident Christians should see their Benedict Option projects as building a better future not only for themselves but for everyone around them. That’s a grand vision, but Benda knew that most people weren’t interested in standing up for abstract causes that appealed only to intellectuals. He advocated practical actions that ordinary Czechs could do in their daily lives.

My Czech host, Father Stepan Smolen, arranged with the Benda family for me to visit the Prague apartment where Dr. Benda and his wife Kamila Bendova lived and raised their six children, now all adults with kids of their own. Kamila still lives there, and was able to gather five of the Benda children (and some of the Benda grandchildren) there in the family living room to meet me on Sunday night.

Last week, I published an interview with Flagg Taylor about Vaclav Benda and his work. [3] Flagg once told me that the Bendas’ sense of Christian hospitality was such that they welcomed into their apartment dissidents, students, and ordinary people who wanted advice, counsel, or company in the long struggle against totalitarianism. And the other night, they welcomed me.

Father Stepan and I climbed two flights of stairs and stood outside the apartment door, looking at the nameplate. So this is the place.

We were invited in by Patrick Benda, one of the six Benda children, all of whom are adults now. The apartment has high ceilings, and looks like exactly the kind of place you would expect a Prague intellectual to dwell. It was slightly shabby, in an utterly charming way. The walls are lined with tens of thousands of books. Here’s a shelf with photos of the grandchildren:

The sitting room where the Bendas held (and still hold) their seminars is dominated both by bookshelves and a massive crucifix:

Faith, family, and books: that’s what the Bendas are all about. This room is an icon of a way of living.

It is also a holy place, at least to me. Kamila told me on Sunday, “Because we lived just down the street from the place where the secret police tortured people, victims would often come here as soon as they were released, just to talk.” They knew there would be comfort at the Bendas’ house.

This is the house in which they raised their children. Kamila told me that she, a university professor of mathematics (like her late husband) read to her kids two to three hours every day.

“Every day?” I asked.

“Every day,” she said. It was part of their intellectual formation.

J.R.R. Tolkien and his Lord of the Rings was a cornerstone of the family’s imagination. I asked Kamila why.

“Because we knew Mordor was real. We felt that their story” — the hobbits and others resisting Mordor — “was our story too.”

She told me that as a mathematician, she knows that the ideology of science is what drives the world today. “Tolkien’s dragons are more realistic than a lot of things we have in this world,” she said, wisely.

We sat around in a big circle, the extended family (plus two other friends), Father Stepan, and I, talking about the Benedict Option, and about the family’s life under communism. The kids told me that their father raised them to be morally responsible in a particular way. He warned them that anything they might do to get in trouble — public drunkenness, for example — would be used by the government against him.

“That’s a heavy burden for a teenager to carry,” I said.

“We don’t see it that way,” said Martin Benda. “For us, it was a matter of being responsible to something outside of ourselves.”

Kamila talked about how she once received a letter from Vaclav from prison. In it, he wrote of the possibility that they would emigrate in exchange for early release.

“I wrote back to tell him no, that he would be better off staying in prison to fight for what we believe is true,” she told me.

Think of it: this woman was raising six kids all alone because her husband was a political prisoner. Yet she told him that the cause they served was more important than the relief of their suffering.

The kids told about how their parents vaccinated them against the disease of communist ideology by raising them to know that the things they heard at school and in the media were lies. In other words, Vaclav and Kamila were consciously countercultural, and understood that they had to impart the same sense to their children, to keep from losing their children to propaganda.

One of the Benda grandchildren said that her own father still does something like that: assigning the kids a certain book to read each month.

Vaclav Benda seems fearless, but Martin Benda said he was not a natural hero. Martin talked about a moment during the communist era in which his mother was late coming home, and he saw his father checking the window over and over, anticipating that she might have been arrested by the secret police.

 

“This is the moment when I started to admire my father even more,” said Martin. “That’s when I saw he was human. He was scared, but he did not want fear to master him.”

At one point, we were talking about the atmosphere of militant progressivism in the West, and how hard it is for Czechs to understand what’s happening in American universities. One of the Benda family friends, an academic, asked me if I had heard of Jordan B. Peterson. Yes, of course, I said.

“He is a miracle!” said this man.

Someone present explained that under communism, underground Christians looked with admiration to the West. But now they see so much decadence in the West, and don’t want it. Nor do they want to have anything to do with Putinism from the East — but this is what pro-Western Czech Christians often accuse them of. That is, if they don’t endorse whatever liberal theological fads are coming from the West, then that must mean (according to their enemies) that they are fellow travelers of Putinism. It’s not true, but that’s a particular struggle they face.

I kept thanking this amazing family for what they had given me through their father’s words and their own example. Patrick Benda told me that reading the new Czech translation of The Benedict Option inspired him to gather his wife and kids together, and tell them that they’re going to start praying together as a family. I thanked him for that, and said this is a good example of how we Christians today, building our parallel polis, need each other.

While I was sitting there, I was thinking about how much, much more this family has to teach us all about how to live faithfully in a world that is hostile to your Christian beliefs. I am sure this will not be the last time I see them, or visit their apartment, that shrine of faithful resistance and human decency. We in the West need to hear more, much more, from the wife and children of Vaclav Benda, the watchman who kept faith through the long night. Spending that evening with them, in their cavernous, book-filled apartment, was one of the great privileges of my life. I am deeply, deeply grateful to them all.

The Benda family at home

The Benda family at home, Sunday March 11, 2018

Hey readers, if any of you are in Prague, I’m giving a free Ben Op lecture in Prague tonight (March 13) at the Archbishop’s Residence. Come say hello!

 

30 Comments (Open | Close)

30 Comments To "My Night At Vaclav Benda’s"

#1 Comment By Phillip On March 13, 2018 @ 8:02 am

“Because we knew Mordor was real.”

What an utterly chilling statement, all the more so because it was true for them.

And will be for us.

#2 Comment By Giuseppe Scalas On March 13, 2018 @ 8:22 am

That’s humbling Rod, thanks for telling us this story.

#3 Comment By MikeS On March 13, 2018 @ 9:04 am

“…their parents vaccinated them against the disease of communist ideology by raising them to know that the things they heard at school and in the media were lies”. Replace ‘communist’ with ‘SJW’ and this quote fits the USA to a T. The BenOp and equivalents will be doing this vaccination here.

#4 Comment By Caroline walker On March 13, 2018 @ 9:09 am

This is beautiful and inspiring. Thank you!

#5 Comment By Khalid mir On March 13, 2018 @ 9:26 am

Wonderful post, Rod! Haven’t been able to find the book here but did read his few pages on the parallel polis (online). Thanks for recommending it.

#6 Comment By Bernie On March 13, 2018 @ 9:30 am

I genuinely wonder what Brenda’s opinion is of the Chinese government’s proposal to the Pope that it put forward three Bishops’ names for each vacancy and the Pope must choose one from its list. I think a decision will be made by the Vatican on this proposal (or ultimatum?) by May.

[NFR: Well, Vaclav Benda died in 1999, but it’s not hard for me to imagine what his opinion would have been. — RD]

#7 Comment By Susan Yerby On March 13, 2018 @ 9:31 am

It was uplifting to read of your wonderful evening with this extraordinary family this morning. Plenty of good advice for everyone trying to live the Benedict Option in there. I’m feeling a little more hopeful after reading it and watching a livestream of Cardinal Sarah from Toronto last night, speaking mostly to young university students. I look forward to hearing about the rest of your journey.

#8 Comment By ludo On March 13, 2018 @ 10:04 am

I think this fellow made a horrible mistake intuitively supporting Anglo-American style capitalism (he´s reported to have been a great admirer of Margaret Thatcher, indeed, even of the brutal Chilean dictator Pinochet).

As has now been made exceedingly clear a radical indeterminacy is either inherent in Anglo-American capitalism or has radically grated onto it beginning during the neoliberal decades of the late 20th century, in effect, injecting both capitalism itself and the society it ineluctably informs with a radical indeterminacy, which is not only fundamentally contrary and destructive to the integuments/ligaments of cultural and national traditionalism (unlike what is still a quotidianly lived experience in many countries in Europe), but indeed to the very notion of the possiblity of a nationally or even regionally shared minima of democratic (as opposed to elite capitalist ordered) reality in the U.S: where all is reduced and traduced into a sort of cheap, dime-store counterfeit Heisenbergian uncertainty /indeterminacy principle in the service of neoliberal capitalist hegemony.

The post-Stalinist Soviet Union ultimately turned against its own, albeit necessarily technologically more primitive, versions of this inexorably truth-reductive principle in the political and economic spheres, hence the emergence of an intellectual, humanist, reformer, i.e. Gorbachev.

It is in the U.S., on the contrary, that radical intederminacy has (perhaps inevitably) been allowed to reach its most expansive point of cannibalistic florescence, a phenomenon of truth (a truth of our time) that is inherently antagonistic and insatiably devorative of all other truths subsumed within the power of its jealous hegemony, even as it remains maddeningly concealed and camouflaged in the midst and mists of hothouse capitalist(-determined) indeterminacy.

#9 Comment By Bob Merrill On March 13, 2018 @ 10:41 am

Rod – Thanks for your insights into this great family. Perhaps Benda, and those of his like who found ways to thrive under oppressive systems, would make a terrific topic for your next book!

I’m very much looking forward to my visit to Prague and Budapest in the Fall.

#10 Comment By charles cosimano On March 13, 2018 @ 10:49 am

I just had a vision of my followers wearing t shirts with “Tolkien lied, Sauron won” printed on them.

Ok,you a look like a pretty normal bunch except for the weird fellow with a gray beard and glasses leering at the camera. 🙂

Ok, to be serious for half a second, there is another phrase for “parallel polis” and that is “state within a state.” The survival track record of such things is not particularly good.

#11 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On March 13, 2018 @ 11:27 am

A better system cannot guarantee a better life, but the process by which human beings communicate with each other and organize endeavors that are larger than one person can accomplish along is VERY important. A great deal of friction, anger, animosity, competition, rivalry, hostility, is due more to the simple fact that information does not flow everywhere its needed, and people are going off half-baked not really knowing all they need to know to make rational decisions. A great deal of economic inequality, and all the pathologies that flow from it, are based on how systems are structured.

Mordor is fiction. And much as I enjoy Tolkien’s prose, his symbolism is explicitly racist at times. Plus, in real life, there is no True King who will be wise, benevolent, and sacrifice himself for his people. Only in fiction. Wakanda is also fiction, albeit “Black Panther” was great drama.

#12 Comment By sjb On March 13, 2018 @ 12:07 pm

RE: “One of the Benda family friends, an academic, asked me if I had heard of Jordan B. Peterson. Yes, of course, I said. “He is a miracle!” said this man.”

I would agree that Peterson is a gift and add that we would do well to pay more attention to him. One of the things he is pointing out to his listeners is that ordinary people fall prey to becoming part of evil movements. He has said, “Statically speaking, the chances of you being one of the people who resisted nazism in Germany are very low.” And, “Even when the stakes are low, people won’t speak up.” People become evil one step at a time, one choice at a time. Peterson said the best book documenting this process is “Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland”, by Christopher Browning.

Peterson has a recommended reading list that is a good antidote to the false belief that humanity is basically good at heart. He is doing his best to warn anyone who will listen to the dangers we are facing. If history is our teacher, the majority will slide down the slippery slope. Each step will be rationalized and justified. Scary to think how many of these people will be our neighbors. Below is a link to a short video where he speaks about this and has links to his reading list and other useful links. Peterson is an ally in many ways.

Ordinary Men, Psychopaths, and Hitler…. – Dr Jordan B Peterson
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#13 Comment By Al Kawi On March 13, 2018 @ 12:09 pm

Thanks, Rod, for telling us about the Bendas. Their’s is an inspiring story for multiple reasons. It is bracing, too, to read about devout Christian Czechs. Contemportary Czech society is often, and I suppose accurately, described as one of the most secularized in the world.

In reality, the story of the Bendas perhaps should not surprise as much as it does. In the USSR, the majority of prisoners of conscience were Christians (Baptists and other Protestestants especially). not political dissidents or Jewish refuseniks seeking to emigrate. But few scholars, let alone more popular writers, have devoted attention to the perdominance of Christian prisoners or conscience under Soviet Communism because it did not fit their mental map of the way the world is supposed to work. They simply could not make sense of it.

Similarly, their reaction to Solzhenitsyn’s critique of the West was not, ‘Wait, what this guy has to say is unpleasant for us to hear, but we owe it to him and to ourselves to hear him out given what he has seen of the world.’ Instead the reaction was to condemn and dismiss him as a reprobate.

#14 Comment By mark_be On March 13, 2018 @ 12:14 pm

“Because we knew Mordor was real.”

I was in Poland in 2010 when the Polish government plane crashed in Smolensk. More than once, I heard statements like “Mordor will always be Mordor.”

While not very often commented upon, Central European conservatives must feel a bit queasy, stuck between liberal/progressive influences from the West, Western conservative and nationalistic parties openly infatuated with Putin, and some of their own advocating the creation of “illiberal democracies,” a friendlier description for the system previously known as autocracy.

#15 Comment By Will Harrington On March 13, 2018 @ 1:26 pm

Charles. but sometimes the state within a state succeeds wildly. Christianity, the United States, and, of course, Czechia, are three quick examples (or did you think the revolution was not created by states within the British Empire?). History is replete with more than enough examples to say go for it.

#16 Comment By March Hare On March 13, 2018 @ 2:15 pm

One of my coworkers a few years back was a Polish expat, who tried to explain to me the world that his father (who narrowly escaped the Katyn forest massacre) was in, circa 1939. “To our west, we could see Hitler, to our east we could see Stalin. Our own leaders were horrible, but who would you have chosen instead?” Of course, no choice was actually made, and the Poles managed to get the worst of both.

I can certainly sympathize with any thoughtful Czech who looks east and sees Putin and looks west and sees the LGBTQWTM mess.

Since I share the Czechs’ widespread atheism, I know what choice I would make. Putin and his descendants will be looming over eastern Europe for a long time to come, whereas I am confident that much of the LGBTQblahblah will meekly disappear on its own. (And the LGBT folks don’t have an army.)

#17 Comment By Tex Austin On March 13, 2018 @ 3:39 pm

“Because we knew Mordor was real.”

Seeing this I couldn’t help but think back to a story a friend told me of his experience at a pro-life march. His description of the raving lunatics frothing at the mouth and protesting the marchers — mostly obese women, covered with tattoos, their faces hideously studded with metallic ornaments — evoked for me nothing so much as Tolkien’s Orcs.

And re. the Jordan Peterson “miracle” — I agree. The sentiment expressed in a recent article in Crisis Magazine describing him as “almost single-handedly saving Western civilization” (I can’t find the link) strikes me as only a slight exaggeration.

#18 Comment By Toronto reader On March 13, 2018 @ 3:57 pm

I had the chance to meet Vaclav Benda in 1989. My friends and I had travelled to Prague on our summer break from university.

One of my companions was a Czech/Canadian and he had relatives in the city. They were distantly attached to the dissent movement at the local university. I had heard about Vaclav Havel through the writer Josef Škvorecký who lived in Toronto and wanted to meet him.

Being young and stupid, I thought I could just waltz into town and get an audience with the great man. I was told he was under (periodic) house arrest at the time but the movement’s “#2 man” was available- Vaclav Benda. I jumped at the chance although I had never heard of Benda. (My Czech/Canadian friend declined to meet him because he didn’t want any trouble for himself or his family. Looking back, I can understand why.)

It was near the secret police station like you say. My new friends made “jokes” about a leading dissent living so close by.

Benda was very cordial and pleasant. To be honest, I don’t remember anything of the conversation. He lived in nice large apartment (maybe the one you describe). I remember the books but I don’t remember seeing the crucifix.

He gave me a letter to “smuggle” out of the country. As I recall, it was addressed to someone in California.

It was a time of great upheaval in Prague. Thousands of students were marching downtown everyday. Hundreds of young soldiers from the countryside trying to keep a lid on the protesters. All the major intersections were cut off but we were able to mostly move freely because we told the soldiers we were Canadians and we were staying at a hotel on Wenceslaus square. Incredibly, they let us pass all the checkpoints.

The one time the soldiers rushed the students and we felt scared, me and my buddies sought shelter in the U Jelinku bar. The bar operators barricaded the door and windows, and we rode out the protest getting drunk alongside the locals. I brought my family (including my parents, wife and children) to the same bar 20 years later.

#19 Comment By Hound of Ulster On March 13, 2018 @ 4:33 pm

The Poles and the Czechs especially have been stuck between bad choices. The Polish view of themselves as ‘Christ among nations’, while overdramatizing somewhat, is not THAT far off, especially in light of the history of Poland since 1790. The Czechs less so, but the Nazi occupation, and the Slovak nationalists’ decision under Tiso to support the destruction of the only democratic state in Central Europe, was deeply traumatizing, to say nothing of being locked behind the Iron Curtain against the will of the majority of Czechoslovaks in 1948. History has punched both countries in the face with sad regularity.

#20 Comment By sjb On March 13, 2018 @ 8:53 pm

RD: ““That’s a heavy burden for a teenager to carry,” I said. “We don’t see it that way,” said Martin Benda. “For us, it was a matter of being responsible to something outside of ourselves.”

This is such a beautiful post and such a good point here. There used to be so much more emphasis in child-rearing in regards to a child’s responsibility towards their family. Children knew they were members of a family instead of the center of the universe. Those were different days.

I can’t shake what the Benda’s family friend, who is an academic, said about Dr. Peterson, so I would like to offer him a link to a lecture at the University of Queens in Ontario that I found encouraging (this is the same lecture that RD linked a short video showing the protesters breaking windows in a past post).

In the beginning of the lecture, Dr. Bruce Pardy explains that the university made the decision to defend free speech in university lectures and lecture’s topic is the Compelled Speech Law in Canada. Dr. Pardy was using Thomas More as an example for refusing to comply with compelled speech just before the SJWs began their interruptions. Dr. Jordan Peterson was the other speaker. They were quite the team.

The university security quickly removed the protestors inside the building when they tried to disrupt the lecture, but it took much longer for them to stop them battering the windows from the outside. The steady way the speakers, the large audience, and security handled the disrupters and noise was encouraging to watch. They plowed ahead and turned up the microphones. Most of the lecture time ended up being Q&A with impressive questions from obviously intelligent students. How sweet to see normal students! And a university with a backbone! If possible, please pass this on to the Benda’s friend. Academics probably need more encouragement than we may realize? Thank you.

The Queen’s University Talk: The Rising Tide of Compelled Speech
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#21 Comment By sjb On March 13, 2018 @ 9:02 pm

P.S. Please don’t miss the end of the Queens video. It shows the anarchists and their mindless chaos outside the building. Such a stark contrast to the orderly and intelligent Q&A. If more people could see this contrast.. if only. The anarchists days would surely be numbered and the mind of the public would shift to completely unsympathetic?

#22 Comment By Pierre Mondu On March 13, 2018 @ 10:17 pm

Are all the Benda children mensa level adults?

#23 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On March 13, 2018 @ 10:54 pm

His description of the raving lunatics frothing at the mouth and protesting the marchers — mostly obese women, covered with tattoos, their faces hideously studded with metallic ornaments — evoked for me nothing so much as Tolkien’s Orcs.

Sounds to me more like the Harvard Lampoon‘s version of the female Rohirrim.

#24 Comment By Hector_St_Clare On March 14, 2018 @ 10:18 am

I can certainly sympathize with any thoughtful Czech who looks east and sees Putin and looks west and sees the LGBTQWTM mess.

The Czechs just narrowly re-elected a president (economically Left, culturally conservative/reactionary) who wants closer ties with Russia and China. The Czech presidency is mostly ceremonial but from what I’ve read it was sort of seen as a “condensed symbol” of whether the Czechs want to orient themselves towards the West or the East, so it seems like for now they’ve chosen the East. China is currently the second-biggest trading partner for the CR, so it will be interesting if (in future) ethnic nationalists in Eastern Europe avoid the “Russia or the west?” choice by choosing China instead. (China of course, unlike either Russia or the western powers, has no history of acting as an imperial conqueror in Eastern Europe).

Also, it’s worth pointing out that Czechia is the only eastern European country to have gay marriage right now, and that a majority of their population supports gay marriage (which is interesting, consider most of them oppose racial intermarriage).

Since I share the Czechs’ widespread atheism, I know what choice I would make. Putin and his descendants will be looming over eastern Europe for a long time to come, whereas I am confident that much of the LGBTQblahblah will meekly disappear on its own. (And the LGBT folks don’t have an army.)

I mean, this is rather a tendentious statement.

1) Putin is mortal, and when he dies I don’t believe his regime has the ideological roots to sustain itself. The future of Russia is probably authoritarian, of either a communist or a nationalist stripe, but it may or may not look much like Putin. The LGBT movement, on the other hand, has a genuine, sincere and coherent set of ideological beliefs.

2) The LGBT movement doesn’t have an army, but America, Germany, and France do, and their combined armies are more powerful than anything Russia can put in the field. America has also historically both invaded more countries and interfered in more elections than Russia has, so we can hardly play innocent when it comes to imperialism.

#25 Comment By JonF On March 15, 2018 @ 6:26 am

Re: n reality, the story of the Bendas perhaps should not surprise as much as it does. In the USSR, the majority of prisoners of conscience were Christians (Baptists and other Protestestants especially). not political dissidents or Jewish refuseniks seeking to emigrate.

Well, they may not have been Jewish, but they still were political dissidents, their disagreements with the Soviet state based on their Christianity.

#26 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On March 15, 2018 @ 10:57 am

The Czechs just narrowly re-elected a president (economically Left, culturally conservative/reactionary) who wants closer ties with Russia and China.

On that note, Czechoslovakia was the only nation in eastern Europe where the first post-war election actually supported the communist party. Reasons included bitter resentment at the western European powers for betraying them at Munich, and knowledge that the USSR had stood ready to support them, although it lacked a common border at the time, so Britain and France would have had to pressure Poland to allow transit of Soviet arms. The communists definitely blew this advantage by 1950, but the Prague spring 1968 was all about how to build socialism, not about how to uproot it. Czechs are being Czechs, not surrogates for anyone.

Also, it’s worth pointing out that Czechia is the only eastern European country to have gay marriage right now, and that a majority of their population supports gay marriage (which is interesting, consider most of them oppose racial intermarriage).

Gay marriage doesn’t produce inter-racial babies. Nothing “left” about homosexuality. The Greek upper classes in ancient times thought more of their male partners than the wives they kept to bear lawful heirs. Before Hitler decided a purge would be good for him, his brownshirts included a substantial gay contingent.

#27 Comment By Fran Macadam On March 16, 2018 @ 11:35 am

Please define “Putinism.”

#28 Comment By Fran Macadam On March 16, 2018 @ 9:54 pm

“Before Hitler decided a purge would be good for him, his brownshirts included a substantial gay contingent.”

He betrayed them in favor of gaining power over the German army.

#29 Comment By Smithborough On March 17, 2018 @ 6:08 am

“Putinism” would be interesting to reflect on further. It seems to share with SJW beliefs the idea that Truth is merely a social construct and all things are about power. Putinism is the temptation that the post-communist world faces, in the same way that SJWism is the temptation in the West.

#30 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On March 17, 2018 @ 6:30 pm

He betrayed them in favor of gaining power over the German army.

Thank you for your support.

“Putinism” would be interesting to reflect on further. It seems to share with SJW beliefs the idea that Truth is merely a social construct and all things are about power.

If either your or these infantile disorders think this is their unique contribution to human history, apparently the name of Machiavelli has been long forgotten. Or Hammurabi for that matter.