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Is Obama Outlawing Farm Chores?

A couple of you have sent me the link to an outrageous Daily Caller story [1]:

A proposal from the Obama administration to prevent children from doing farm chores has drawn plenty of criticism from rural-district members of Congress. But now it’s attracting barbs from farm kids themselves.

The Department of Labor is poised to put the finishing touches on a rule that would apply child-labor laws to children working on family farms, prohibiting them from performing a list of jobs on their own families’ land.

Under the rules, children under 18 could no longer work “in the storing, marketing and transporting of farm product raw materials.”

“Prohibited places of employment,” a Department press release read, “would include country grain elevators, grain bins, silos, feed lots, stockyards, livestock exchanges and livestock auctions.”

More:

The new regulations, first proposed [2] August 31 by Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, would also revoke the government’s approval of safety training and certification taught by independent groups like 4-H [3] and FFA [4], replacing them instead with a 90-hour federal government training course.

If this were true, it would be outrageous. But it seems to be untrue. Contrary to the Daily Caller’s report, the Labor Department release cited in the hyperlink by the DC itself (!) says, “The proposed regulations would not apply to children working on farms owned by their parents.” 

Furthermore, the Labor Department explains [5]that the proposed regulatory change would not affect people working on neighbors’ farms doing chores. Nor would it mess with 4-H or FFA. The change would only affect young people who are in an employer-employee relationship.

What do you think, readers? Unless the Labor Department is flat-out lying here, it looks like the Daily Caller badly misrepresented the facts.

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45 Comments To "Is Obama Outlawing Farm Chores?"

#1 Comment By MH – secular misanthropist On April 25, 2012 @ 5:45 pm

I seem to recall a recent news story about the death of a minor in a grain elevator as the root cause. So new regulations were put in place to prevent a similar problem.

#2 Comment By icaursr On April 25, 2012 @ 5:57 pm

“Unless the Labor Department is flat-out lying here,”

Er, where did the Daily Caller get its information from? From the Labor Department. So the real question is, unless the staff at Daily Caller have ESP, they are a lying bunch of liars.

#3 Comment By Matt On April 25, 2012 @ 6:04 pm

“…it looks like the Daily Caller badly misrepresented the facts.”

The implication is that the Daily Caller misrepresenting facts is unusual. It’s not.

#4 Comment By R Hampton On April 25, 2012 @ 6:18 pm

The Daily Caller is first and foremost sensationalist, so I would not rely upon their reporting without independent corroboration.

#5 Comment By Sean On April 25, 2012 @ 6:20 pm

It’s sad to say, because I try to not fall into easy, habitual dismissal of stories that put “my side” in a bad light, but as soon as I saw that story, I knew it wouldn’t turn out to be true/would have a perfectly reasonable explanation that fell far short of the claim made.

Maybe it’s the weekly forwarded email from my dear Palinite-Calvinist father, or the near-daily new outrage posted by my more Fox News-inclined facebook friends, but I’ve been conditioned over the last few years to simply disbelieve any story that sounds too nefarious to be true when the bad guy is a Democrat. Sometimes I wish my dad or Glenn Beck would get something right just to prevent me from slipping into straight-up party hackery.

You can only cry “wolf” so many times.

#6 Comment By Mike W On April 25, 2012 @ 6:22 pm

So my teenage son wants to work this summer, but it is amazing how many places he “can’t” work because he’s not old enough. I don’t know how many times I’ve heard people complain about those “lazy teenagers” riding around on their skateboards during the summer, but you’d be amazed at how few opportunities there are for kids to work (and learn how to work) and make a little money while they’re doing it. In addition, because of the bad economy, many entry levels jobs are being done by adults who can’t find anything better.

Best,
Mike

#7 Comment By Agentzero On April 25, 2012 @ 6:41 pm

When in doubt, read the proposed regulation in question:

“Sec. 570.97 Purpose and scope.

(b) Parental Exception. This subpart shall not apply to the employment of a child below the age of 16 by his parent or by a person standing in the place of his parent on a farm owned or operated by such parent or person.”

Seems pretty clear to me.

The “90-hour federal government training course” is also a misrepresentation. The regulations contemplate that notwithstanding the general rule that you need to be at least 16 to work for hire in farm activities deemed particularly hazardous, 14- and 15-year-old children may work as hired farm workers in these activities if they are doing so as a “vocational agricultural student-learner”, which requires, among other things, that you be “enrolled in an ongoing vocational education training program in agriculture operated by a state or local educational authority, or in a substantially similar program conducted by a private school;” and have “satisfactorily completed the equivalent of at least 90 hours of systematic school instruction in agricultural education at or above the eighth grade level.”

Link: [6]

#8 Comment By BasilNova On April 25, 2012 @ 6:42 pm

There’s something rotting and rotten in this sort of thing. At this point, it doesn’t even matter if the story is true or not. It’s already all over my facebook feed and other social media sites. Another seed of distrust has been placed in the minds of the kind of people who still believe our President isn’t a U.S. citizen, or is a stealth crypto-Marxist bent on destroying our nation. Show these folks that the story is a far distance from factual and 90% (I live in farm country, so this story has traction) will still believe it. It’s just dizzying and disheartening.

#9 Comment By Marchmaine On April 25, 2012 @ 6:48 pm

My personal experience with lots of Farm Regulation is that they write the regulations to apply universally, then put exemptions in a separate amendable/revokable section. Sometimes these exemptions are clear and simple, sometimes they are (IMO) intentionally ambiguous.

Further, they sometimes let it out through extension agents that certain regulated activities are not being aggressively enforced at this time. A recent example of this was the FDA stating that it would not prosecute consumers of raw milk (that cross state lines), though it retains the regulatory authority to do so.

So, my experience is not so much that (Agriculture) Regulations are written in very draconian ways, it is that they are written (often explicitly) so that the enforcement agencies have broad latitude as to what constitute an infraction… and this definition can and does change.

#10 Comment By libertarian jerry On April 25, 2012 @ 6:59 pm

As long as you apply for and possess a Social Security number,the Federal Government and it’s Dept.of Labor has jurisdiction over anyone in the workforce. They can set the work rules,even on a private family farm. As an aside,the minimum wage prevents many untrained and inexperienced teens from getting entry level or part time jobs. Economist Walter Williams has commented on this many times,sighting Black teenage unemployment,in the inner city,as being over 50%.

#11 Comment By Brian On April 25, 2012 @ 7:07 pm

I sincerely hope that this is indeed a case of MSM incompetence, not government incompetence.

But let’s cut the Daily Caller (a site I confess I’m not really familiar with, as far as ideology or accuracy goes) a little slack. This issue has been percolating for the last few months, rising ALMOST to the MSM every few weeks it seems. There’s a lot of real concern about this. It’s not like the Daily Caller made this up. Presumably some press release made it to someone at this website, and they got a few quotes and posted a story about it. Hopefully the DoL website is accurate about the intent and scope of this new rule, but there’s a lot of justifiable skepticism about such things.

#12 Comment By Kelly On April 25, 2012 @ 7:10 pm

While the Caller may have misrepresented the “chores” part, after reading the Dept. of Labor links, I still don’t think I could support it.

It seems prohibit all employment at certain business. That seems to be too broad. I understand saftey concerns, but every one of those buisness have an office attached to them, and I can’t see how prohibiting a 16 year old from helping out in the office of an elevator does any good. (I helped my aunt in the office in a fertilizer company quite often as a kid).

I also spent a great deal of my youth in stockyards and sale barns and don’t see a whole lot of issues there, either. Certainly nothing that many of the same kids aren’t already doing on their home farms anyway.

I get the saftey concerns about elevators and grain bins, but many of the kids that would be working there probably have grain bins and silos at home, so I’m not sure you’re really protecting them from anything by not letting them make a few extra bucks working at the elevator.

#13 Comment By MIke On April 25, 2012 @ 7:24 pm

The Daily Caller is not MSM. It is run by Tucker Carlson and has been the source of many of the “gotcha” videos that pass a journalism these days. It is even more ideological than Fox or MSNBC, which arguably are MSM.

#14 Comment By John E. On April 25, 2012 @ 7:28 pm

Thanks, Agentzero

#15 Comment By Scott in PA On April 25, 2012 @ 7:32 pm

What’s getting lost here is that most people, apparently, think it’s alright for the government to prohibit 16 and 17 year olds from working “in the storing, marketing and transporting of farm product raw materials.”

#16 Comment By MikeP On April 25, 2012 @ 8:42 pm

What is the current youth unemployment rate? What jobs are availavle in rural reas for those who will be forced out of these jobs.

What is the rate of fatal or serious accidents involving teen workers in agriculture? Is it going up or down?

Why is this work too dangerous for a teen to perform for pay but just fine if done for free?

Rural youth have been doing this work, well, since farming began. Are they and their parents no longer competent to judge the risks and rewards for themselves?

#17 Comment By Becky On April 25, 2012 @ 9:06 pm

There must be some truth. look up the video: Watch Sen. Moran lecture Hilda Solis. It’s in the yahoo news article:

[7]

#18 Comment By Connie On April 25, 2012 @ 9:16 pm

See Joel Saletin’s article, “Everything I want to do is illegal,” which he later turned into a book.

[8]

#19 Comment By Zilbert On April 25, 2012 @ 9:25 pm

Sadly, the caller is misleading people (again). This is not about teenagers doing work on farms, but doing hazardous, industrial jobs they aren’t trained for. From an article about two teens drowning in grain last July:

[9]

By law, OSHA is prohibited from spending any funds to regulate the activities of farmers with 10 or fewer employees. But even farms that fall into this category “should be following the standards because they save lives,” said Scott Allen, an OSHA spokesman.

At the Mount Carroll grain elevator where the two teens died last summer, crucial safety measures were ignored, according to an OSHA investigation released in late January that cited the facility’s owner, Haasbach LLC, for 24 violations and proposed a $555,000 fine. Haasbach, of Warren, Ill., is owned by members of three large farming families.

The outfit didn’t train the young workers, provide safety harnesses, make sure machinery was turned off, guarantee an observer was present or develop an emergency action plan in case of accidents, among other forms of negligence, OSHA alleges….

In a separate investigation, the U.S. Labor Department found that Haasbach violated child labor laws by hiring youngsters under 18 years of age to perform hazardous jobs prohibited for children under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Haasbach attorney Timothy Zollinger contests that, noting that Illinois child labor laws exempt minors engaged in agricultural pursuits.

#20 Comment By wm On April 25, 2012 @ 9:54 pm

It is true that it does not cover kids on farms, but don’t be so confident that this is pure hysteria. All it takes is one nazi with a clipboard to decide that the apple stand out front is technically different than the barn out back and therefore…. don’t kid yourself. Furthermore, most of these farm kids also take work at jobs such as the local grain elevator. Why shouldn’t they – this is the industry/environment they will be working in their whole lives.

This is the camel’s nose under the tent, frog boiling, choose your metaphor – and when considered alongside the actions of the Monasanto owned legislature regarding seeds, the NAIS, and so forth, there is good reason to fear this.

#21 Comment By Doubter4444 On April 25, 2012 @ 10:02 pm

——- Mike P —–What is the current youth unemployment rate? What jobs are availavle in rural reas for those who will be forced out of these jobs.
What is the rate of fatal or serious accidents involving teen workers in agriculture? Is it going up or down?
Why is this work too dangerous for a teen to perform for pay but just fine if done for free?
Rural youth have been doing this work, well, since farming began. Are they and their parents no longer competent to judge the risks and rewards for themselves? ——

So what?
That’s not the point of this post – I may agree with you – but the point in this post is the -yet again- lies that a right wing rag is passing around.
And that sucks.

To that point, I admire Sean as I would someone on the left that stood up to this nonsense and starting calling for what it is.

As an example, go to Outside the Beltway and check out the post entitled: Man Beaten and to Some it is Time to Score Some Political Points (sorry if it’s bad form to tout another blog -but it fits with this discussion)
about the inability of partisans to concede a flaw on their side, while decrying every wart and comment for the other side. over 400 comments and 100 of those are literally na,na, na by an extremely tormenting troll showing how far from a real conversation we’ve drifted.

We are so rapidly losing any ability to call things what they are, and in fact gleefully going down that road, and it’s to everyones disservice.

You elided the point of the post to make a another point entirely (and I’m not saying you’re doing it to score a hit on the president or anything), and it’s habit forming to do so.

Sorry for the rant. And no imputation to you Mr. Mike P.

#22 Comment By Nolan On April 25, 2012 @ 10:22 pm

I have questions. I live in a farming community, but my dad is an engineer, so we do not run a farm, but we have a garden and some goats. I love summer work and part time work at local farms! If my family doesn’t own the farm, would I be allowed the opportunity to work under these regulations? Also, I sometimes cut grass on my uncle’s farm with a large riding lawn mower. He’s family, but he’s not my parent. Would that be outlawed also? Would I have to complete 90 hours of training for that equipment? (I think it took me about 5 minutes to learn) This has got me a little concerned, or at least a little angry.

#23 Comment By Peterk On April 25, 2012 @ 10:33 pm

i’m amused by all the folks how are saying the DC is misleading people as I wonder how many of these same folks accept as gospel truth some of the sensationalism put forth by liberal/progressive newssites.

“or by a person standing in the place of his parent on a farm owned or operated by such parent or person.””

the devil is in the details in that how do you identify the above individual.

why is the DOL even sticking their nose into what should be a decision by the parents? is it because the farms are engaged in “interstate commerce”?

#24 Comment By Angela On April 25, 2012 @ 10:39 pm

I used to think Bush Derangement Syndrome was bad with my Democratic friends, but I think Obama Derangement Syndrome and the ability to believe unbelievable and unverifiable actions from his administration is off the charts.

Not even mentioning the tendency to than defend the ridiciulous belief that is obviously mistaken.

Most people don’t want to know the reality, they just want their beliefs and feelings confirmed.

#25 Comment By Brian On April 26, 2012 @ 8:26 am

Connie: For a good laugh, you can look at the amazon review page of Salatin’s book of the same name, and search for the two star reviews, all of which basically say: “Dude, I wanted to read about organic farming, but this guy, like, thinks abortion is bad and the government is too! I’m so bummed.” Classic.

#26 Comment By Josh Brown On April 26, 2012 @ 8:50 am

I’ve not worked with grain silos before since my family did truck farming, where we put everything we picked but didn’t plan to keep and sold it at a farmer’s market from the tailgate. However, I have talked to people who have. It’s essentially like sticking your head into a moonshine distillery. The grain ferments in the silo. If you aren’t careful, the smell will knock you out. That said, if my family did have grain silos and my father or grandfather had told me to go up there, I can guarantee you I would have.

#27 Comment By John Haas On April 26, 2012 @ 10:29 am

wm: “This is the camel’s nose under the tent, frog boiling, choose your metaphor – and when considered alongside the actions of the Monasanto owned legislature regarding seeds, the NAIS, and so forth, there is good reason to fear this.”

You forgot Agenda 21 !!! [10]

#28 Comment By Thomas Aquinas On April 26, 2012 @ 10:40 am

If you mean by “farm chores,” “sex,” then the Department of Labor not only permits it, but requires the local Catholic Church to purchase condoms for the youngsters. This is, after all, America, where freedom means the right to require conscience-bound dissenters to underwrite the personal satisfactions of adolescents and Georgetown law students.

#29 Comment By John Haas On April 26, 2012 @ 11:05 am

“… the Department of Labor … requires the local Catholic Church to purchase condoms for the youngsters.”

I don’t think Thomas Aquinas said that.

#30 Comment By brians On April 26, 2012 @ 11:05 am

So, we can say the Daily Caller misrepresented the facts at least as bad as the Labor Department. Besides – do we really need new leglislation every time an accident happens? That’s why I have to keep my kids in booster seats till they’re 15. It’s gotta stop somewhere.

#31 Comment By Cathy J. On April 26, 2012 @ 11:44 am

It would make it legal if the parents solely own the farm. If it is owned by anyone else, i.e. grandparents, uncles, aunts, neighbor, they would apply. Live stock auctions are included. Would that not inhibit fairs and 4-H? This should be a parental decision based on the maturity and ability of the child, not the government’s say so.

#32 Comment By Rod Dreher On April 26, 2012 @ 11:47 am

It would make it legal if the parents solely own the farm. If it is owned by anyone else, i.e. grandparents, uncles, aunts, neighbor, they would apply. Live stock auctions are included. Would that not inhibit fairs and 4-H? This should be a parental decision based on the maturity and ability of the child, not the government’s say so.

Not true, at least according to the Labor Dept. This only applies in the case of formal employees. Your kid could do chores on his neighbor’s farm with no problem.

#33 Comment By Mike On April 26, 2012 @ 11:59 am

do we really need new leglislation every time an accident happens?

I agree. Why should we be worried about child labor or even worker safety. Given the way the market regulated itself in, say, Upton Sinclair’s time, why would want laws that interfere with an employer’s ability to control his employees.

I mean, if I employ a 14 year old and want to have her work 10-hours a day in a farm field doing dangerous work–knowing she’s probably unable to complain–why should the government get involved.

#34 Comment By cp On April 26, 2012 @ 12:46 pm

Angela:

I used to think Bush Derangement Syndrome was bad with my Democratic friends, but I think Obama Derangement Syndrome and the ability to believe unbelievable and unverifiable actions from his administration is off the charts.

AMEN!

The problem is pretty straightforward: Having embraced hate we’re prepared to believe any lie that feeds that hatred, and to defend any lie that justifies that hatred, because we’re already in the grip of evil. The Bush-haters and Obama-haters alike suffer from the same spiritual illness.

If you want to know why the nation is “divided” at a time when in terms of actual policy the things that separate us are relatively minor, one need only see how hatred has been stoked as a way of achieving audience share and electoral success.

Hate is the problem, lying serves our hatred.

#35 Comment By MikeP On April 26, 2012 @ 1:07 pm

Chores on the neighbor’s farm?

So if a teen works for free, it’s OK. But if there’s money involved, it’s much too dangerous?

#36 Comment By Jase On April 26, 2012 @ 3:40 pm

Wow! Imagine ,as a farmer /rancher, my first time visiting here there is actually something about my way of life. Now imagine my disappointment at reading the “story” and the responses to it. I would say, Mr. Dreher, you should stick to a subject you know something about, farming and this rule from the DOL is not one of them.
I’m also amazed at to see so many “Conservatives” acting like Liberals and discussing a subject they have no knowledge about as if they possess knowledge.
Let me say that I don’t read the daily caller, however they aren’t as misleading as the people here are trying to make out. There’s a reason that those of us who engage in farming and ranching are pushing back on this.
Take a look at the time line on this regulation:
1) In January 2011 the President issues an Executive Order asking for a rule on child labor on farms.
2)In September 2011 the DOL publishes an initial rule restricting child labor on extended family and farm partnerships (something not in current law). The DOL invites public comment. Does no one see the payoff to labor unions here with the possibility of forcing farmers and ranchers to hire more unionized labor and more dues into the labor union?
3) A backlash reverberates through the rural community.
4) In February 2012 the DOL is forced to issue a press release promising that the previous rule allowing our children to help out on partnerships with substantial interest are to followed until the new rule is published. Did everyone get that part, until the new rule is published! What exactly will that new rule be, anyone want to venture a guess? Considering that we farmers have had the EPA try to force regulations on us that would make us have to treat a milk spill on our own property as if it was toxic waste or at the very least a petroleum product because the EPA is considering milk to be oil due to it’s butter fat content; or the EPA regulation aimed at reducing dust stirred up by farming activities which would allow the EPA to regulate the time of year, time of day and how many hours in the day we are allowed to preform certain activities necessary to farming; or how about the Food Modernization act which a Democratic Senate with the help of some old “Conservative” has been trying to pass off onto us farmers which would among many things would allow the government to regulate your giving surplus tomatoes from your garden to your neighbor.
5) In April 2012 the final rule is yet to be written and the DC reports on the controversy and the backlash in the rural community. The only misrepresentation on the part of the DC is not reporting the press February press release, which doesn’t really make much difference because as the February press release makes clear it is only a temporary solution until the new rule is written.

I noticed that most of you commenting know nothing about farming/ranching, how we live or how we run our businesses, so let me educate you a little.
For most of us farming and ranching is a way of life, not only for our families, but also for our communities. Many “family farms” are LLCs, single family partnerships and multi family partnerships. The originally proposed rule exempted children working on farms “solely owned by their parents”, as is often the case children often spend time doing chores on the farms of grandparents, uncles and aunts and neighbors, all of which would not be allowed. Also not allowed in the original proposal would be children working on family partnerships and partnerships of more than one family. Our children would also not be allowed to participate in activities in various seasons where we help out our neighbors and they help us such as spring and fall roundups, branding, tagging and the like.
One of the regulations would not allow our children to be around breeding animals (not animals in the act of breeding, but animals used for breeding), by that rule alone our children cannot be on the farm, they can’t collect eggs, feed the chickens or even ride our horses. Maybe you city folk can tell us country bumpkins what we are supposed to do with our children as I don’t know any farm that has animals on it that are not meant for breeding.
Our farms valuable laboratories where our children learn valuable skills, work ethic through hard work and respect for people, animals and wise use of our resources nad rules like this threaten to take that from us.
I realize that city folk don’t give much thought to what goes into producing their food, maybe if the did they would understand the pressure being put on us by this administration. I also realize that city folk think we are somehow not as smart as they are, but I challenge anyone of you city folk to try and do what we do under the tremendous pressure we are getting from this administration. We have to be jacks of all trades. We run our businesses like any other business, we have to understand depreciation and amortization. We are nutritionists formulating feeds to get the best production out of our stock. We are geneticist always improving on the previous generation through selective breeding. We are mechanics often making due with outdated equipment and yet still being efficient. We are truck drivers getting our produce to market. We are horticulturalist always working to get the best out of our crops. We are weather men instinctively knowing when to plant and harvest. We are accountants figuring out complicated property taxes based on use or possible use of or lands. And the list goes on and on, but most importantly we are families made up of fathers and mothers and children who just want to be left alone to do what we have always done.

#37 Comment By Gus On April 26, 2012 @ 4:15 pm

Brian, you’re the person the Daily Caller story was written for. You don’t know any details about any of it, but their must be something to it or they wouldn’t have put it out there? You credulity strains mine.

#38 Comment By Rod Dreher On April 26, 2012 @ 4:18 pm

Jase: I realize that city folk don’t give much thought to what goes into producing their food, maybe if the did they would understand the pressure being put on us by this administration. I also realize that city folk think we are somehow not as smart as they are, but I challenge anyone of you city folk to try and do what we do under the tremendous pressure we are getting from this administration.

You know, Jase, you would get a lot further if you would remove the grain silo-sized chip off your shoulder. You are speaking to a largely sympathetic audience here. No need to be snotty about it.

#39 Comment By Rex Currie On April 26, 2012 @ 5:04 pm

My two children paid for their education by raising animals through the 4H and FFA. They also learned many life lessons along the way. My son worked in the hayfield to make money while growing up. Both my children are now grown, working and paying taxes. Is that not the way America should work?

#40 Comment By Susan On April 26, 2012 @ 6:01 pm

When I went to read the DC article, it had been updated (see excerpt below) and I didn’t find anything objectionable in the updated version. It seemed pretty straight forward and an example being regulated by people who do not understand agriculture. Perhaps the initial version got past the editors or posted too hatily?

As I watched the video at the end of the article (please see the link below), Sen, Moran said that Hildar Solis’ proposal said that 4H, FFA and another program were too locally driven and lacking Federal direction… and this is just the beginning of a list of micro-management proposals. As one who grew up and spent most of my life in rural Colorado (farms and ranches), it’s very disturbing to see ignorance run amuck like this. Please watch the whole thing.

Excerpt from the end of the article:

The Department of Labor did not respond to repeated requests for comment.

——————-

This article was updated after publication to clarify the Department of Labor’s proposed rules related to the narrow “parental exception.” The update comprises the first four paragraphs, above, on page 2 of the article.

Watch Sen. Moran lecture Hilda Solis:

[11]

#41 Comment By TK On April 26, 2012 @ 6:10 pm

As an attorney and a hobby farmer who has a 13 year old son who loves working with our animals and reading Joel Salatin, I do not think the overreach of these regulations has been overblown.

The very complex issue of the ownership of farms by entities like LLCs and partnerships greatly complicates the parental exception.

The news program, linked below, by the media director of the New York farm bureau (a lady who does not seem to be frothing at the mouth in her animosity toward Obama) might add some credence to the Daily Caller article.
[12]

#42 Comment By Cathy J. On April 26, 2012 @ 10:05 pm

Great news! The Obama Admin. has withdrawn it’s proposal!
[13]

#43 Comment By Mitchell Young On April 27, 2012 @ 12:20 am

Ha! Vdare has already covered this issue, like a month ago.

The legislation essentially makes informal ‘hiring’ of teenagers impossible. So if your older brother, whose kids are off at college, offers your 15 year old some cash to do some furrowing or clear some brush, your spawn is SOL. So while Obama’s extended family gets automatic asylum in the US, your extended family can’t help each other out.

BTW a similar thing has happened in California. State ‘labor regulators’ — the kind that can’t seem to find any of the multiple violations that employers of illegal aliens engage in — shut down a hippy-dippy organic farm in North County San Diego. The ‘workers’ were all basically laboring for food, a place to crash, and knowledge. The state would rather illegals be brought in.

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#44 Comment By Brian On April 27, 2012 @ 9:16 am

Gus: Ah, the blessed internet, where folks who know nothing about anything can accuse random strangers who they know nothing about of knowing nothing about anything. And, in spirit of our generous combox rules here, that’s all I’ll say about that.

#45 Comment By Susan Bedwell On April 29, 2012 @ 10:57 am

Rod, this is my first visit to your site, having followed a link in a comment on another (conservative) blog I follow. I wasn’t planning on commenting here at all, but feel compelled to after reading both Jase’s comment and your response to it.

First, I’ll just admit that I didn’t find Jase’s comment to be particularly “snotty” (and I’m a city-born and bred gal). I think he did perhaps get his back up a little, but I understand how that could happen, him being the one in the trenches on this topic and all (and especially since, after reading the comments before his, I didn’t find, as you apparently did, what I would have considered to be a “largely sympathetic audience”. At least not on this particular post. Not at all.).

But the real reason for my comment on this is that, although I see from what you wrote exactly how you feel about *how* Jase said what he said, you never commented on *what* Jase said. I think he made some very good points. Did you not?

Susan
P.S. I read the statute. It’s long. It’s complicated. But here’s something I learned: A 15 year old doing chores on dangerous equipment (as defined in the statute), for which he is paid, on a farm owned by his father and his father’s brother (or his father and his grandfather), being supervised by his uncle or grandfather, would not be exempt. As far as I can see, that would be an example of a youngster doing chores on his own farm, not being exempt. This is exactly what the Daily Caller warned about.