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Homeschoolers Who Want Real Science

Thank you, David Wheeler and Atlantic Online for recognizing that there are Christian homeschoolers who want our kids to learn real science. Take a look at this:

Take Erinn Cameron Warton, an evangelical Christian who homeschools her children. Warton, a scientist, says she was horrified when she opened a homeschool science textbook and found a picture of Adam and Eve putting a saddle on a dinosaur. “I nearly choked,” says the mother of three. “When researching homeschooling curricula, I found that the majority of Christian homeschool textbooks are written from this ridiculous perspective. Once I saw this, I vowed never to use them.” Instead, Warton has pulled together a curriculum inspired partly by homeschool pioneer Susan Wise Bauer and partly by the Waldorf holistic educational movement.

For many evangelical families, the rationale for homeschooling has nothing to do with a belief in Young Earth Creationism or a rejection of evolutionary theory. Some parents choose to homeschool because they’re disenchanted with the values taught in the public school system. Others want to incorporate more travel into their children’s education. Still others want to implement specific learning techniques they believe are more suitable for their children.

But whatever their reason for homeschooling, evangelical families who embrace modern science are becoming more vocal about it — and are facing the inevitable criticism that comes with that choice. “We get a lot of flak from others for not using Christian textbooks,” Warton says.

If you’re one of these Christian homeschoolers, you might want to check out the BioLogos site, co-founded by Francis Collins, which offers a perspective that reconciles mainstream science with Biblical Christianity. It’s a fantastic resource. More, please. I think my old employer, the John Templeton Foundation, which helps support BioLogos, could do a lot to make real science accessible to the growing number of theistic homeschoolers, educational entrepreneurs who need help, direction, and encouragement.

about the author

Rod Dreher is a senior editor at The American Conservative. He has written and edited for the New York Post, The Dallas Morning News, National Review, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, the Washington Times, and the Baton Rouge Advocate. Rod’s commentary has been published in The Wall Street Journal, Commentary, the Weekly Standard, Beliefnet, and Real Simple, among other publications, and he has appeared on NPR, ABC News, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and the BBC. He lives in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with his wife Julie and their three children. He has also written four books, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming, Crunchy Cons, How Dante Can Save Your Life, and The Benedict Option.

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