She’s not even pretending anymore:

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton on Thursday said “deep-seated … religious beliefs” have to be changed before the world’s women will get full access to abortion.

“Far too many women are still denied critical access to reproductive health care and safe childbirth. All the laws we’ve passed don’t count for much if they’re not enforced,” Clinton said.

“Rights have to exist in practice — not just on paper,” Clinton argued. “Laws have to be backed up with resources and political will.”
“And deep-seated cultural codes, religious beliefs and structural biases have to be changed,” Clinton added.

Clinton’s remarks came during the sixth annual Women in The World Summit in New York. She also called on world leaders to speed up progress on women’s rights across the globe.

One is reminded of this passage in Frank Bruni’s column on gay rights:

Creech and Mitchell Gold, a prominent furniture maker and gay philanthropist, founded an advocacy group, Faith in America, which aims to mitigate the damage done to LGBT people by what it calls “religion-based bigotry.”

Gold told me that church leaders must be made “to take homosexuality off the sin list.”

His commandment is worthy — and warranted. All of us, no matter our religious traditions, should know better than to tell gay people that they’re an offense. And that’s precisely what the florists and bakers who want to turn them away are saying to them.

Christians must be “made” to change their deeply held beliefs, will “have to be changed.” Who, exactly, will be imposing the making and the changing?

The 2016 election is going to be a pretty clear and vitally important choice for social and religious conservatives, and people who care about religious liberty. The progressives don’t even have to fake it anymore.

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