“When wealth is lost, nothing is lost; when health is lost, something is lost; when character is lost, all is lost.” — Billy Graham, who is soooo yesterday’s news. Here’s today’s news:

Tony Perkins, the president of the conservative Family Research Council, contended Tuesday that the evangelical community has given President Donald Trump a “mulligan” when it comes to his personal behavior.

“Yes, evangelicals, conservatives, they gave him a mulligan. They let him have a do-over. They said we’ll start afresh with you and we’ll give you a second chance.” Perkins said in a interview on CNN’s “Erin Burnett OutFront.”

… However, Perkins noted that he doesn’t think that evangelical support is “unconditional.”

“That support is not unconditional. If the president for some reason stopped keeping campaign promises and then engaged in that behavior now, the support’s gone,” he said.

Write down that last quote. Trump has to break campaign promises AND cheat on his wife to lose Evangelical support today, according to the president of the Family Research Council. And the president is like,

via GIPHY

Meanwhile, another American Augustine speaks:

“These alleged affairs, they’re alleged with Trump, didn’t happen while he was in office,” Franklin Graham told CNN’s Don Lemon on “CNN Tonight” on Tuesday.

Graham’s remarks come after a Wall Street Journal report that Trump’s lawyer, Michael Cohen, formed a private LLC to pay a former porn star in exchange for not speaking publicly about an alleged sexual encounter with the then-candidate.

CNN has not independently confirmed The Wall Street Journal’s reporting, and in response to the initial Wall Street Journal report about the affair, Cohen said the rumors had circulated since 2011 and that Trump “once again vehemently denies any such occurrence.”

Lemon questioned why “evangelicals were so willing to call out, say Bill Clinton’s behavior but not President Trump’s?”
Graham argued that there’s a difference between Clinton’s extramarital affair and Trump’s “alleged affairs.”

“This happened 11, 12, 13, 14 years ago,” he said. “And so, I think there is a big difference and not that we give anybody a pass, but we have to look at the timeline and that was before he was in office.”

Rabbi Baruch Korff called and offered the use of his kippah.

I can understand voting for Trump for reasons of self-interest. His policies have been  good for conservative Christians. But do you have to explicitly blow your moral credibility sky-high at the same time? Nobody’s making you go on TV to say these things. And nobody is going to give you guys a mulligan on this.

UPDATE: Check out the words of former RNC chair Michael Steele, starting at the 1:40 point. Says it all, really: