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Dope Spotted On Park Avenue

 

Malcolm ‘Billa’ Abbott, noted Park Avenue pothead, whose parents allegedly bought his sister’s way into college (Billa video screengrab [1])

What would we do without our contemporary rich people? [2] From a New York Post story so sweet and rich and buttery you just want it to sit there like a nugget of salted caramel, melting on your tongue forever. Excerpt:

Maybe this is why Gregory and Marcia Abbott [3] allegedly bought their daughter’s way into college.

Their “rapper” son, Malcolm, popped out of the family’s Park Avenue building to smoke a giant blunt — while defending his parents and bragging about his latest CD.

“They’re blowing this whole thing out of proportion,” said Malcolm Abbott outside the home that overlooks the Metropolitan Museum of Art. “I believe everyone has a right to go to college, man.”

In between drags, Malcolm, whose father is the founder of food and beverage distributor International Dispensing Corp., admitted, “I didn’t go to college.”

Do read the whole thing, if only to see the photo of Young Master Abbott and his blunt. [2] Like I even have to ask.

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20 Comments To "Dope Spotted On Park Avenue"

#1 Comment By Nachum On March 14, 2019 @ 4:11 am

Recreational pot use still (at least for the next five seconds) being illegal in New York, I imagine this is for “medical” use.

#2 Comment By Remington40x On March 14, 2019 @ 8:49 am

Although the plural of anecdote is not data, the efforts of the parents in this fiasco suggest that the elites are having no better success in passing along the skills and values that made them successful than many others (including many, if not most Christians) are in passing along their own values to the next generation. All of the parents involved in this scheme seem fairly successful and most don’t appear to have been handed their status on a silver platter. Nonetheless, they have children who seem unmotivated, not particularly focused and probably likely to fall back into the vast muddle of humanity if daddy and mommy don’t continue to remove the obstacles from their life paths.

I’m not sure what this means, except that parenting is extremely hard work and most of us fail to some degree, regardless of our political, social or religious views or economic status.

#3 Comment By jafnhar On March 14, 2019 @ 9:00 am

We all hate rich people until someone starts talking about punitive taxation, no? Why is this kid’s tax rate not 70%? Is he creating jobs or something?

#4 Comment By Elsie in Bklyn On March 14, 2019 @ 9:06 am

If P.G. Wodehouse were alive and writing in NYC today, this kid would be one of his characters. The bit where he plugs his rap album, “Cheese and Crackers,” is beyond a doubt my favorite part. Cheese and Crackers! Thanks for posting this, Rod–I haven’t started my day with a good laugh in a while, but this definitely did the trick.

#5 Comment By JCM On March 14, 2019 @ 9:18 am

Once they are in, how do they keep these less than-promising youths from flunking out? Is the next chapter of the scandal to consist of body doubles taking exams and Pulitzer-prize winners writing papers? Hey, Rod, you are a fantastic and fast writer, there may be gold in them there academic hills. I could see the night before the term paper is due getting a call…”listen my kid messed up…”

#6 Comment By bob On March 14, 2019 @ 9:41 am

Wait, the parents didn’t buy a spot for young Mozart in some ivy institution?

#7 Comment By JohnT On March 14, 2019 @ 9:55 am

[4]

You failed to share about the Carmel’s gooey center. I went to your link and saw that above and had to report. One of the daughters was allegedly on a yacht with a USC official. Was she giving nautical advice? Crew training?

#8 Comment By Rusty On March 14, 2019 @ 10:31 am

Holy smoke that is good stuff. Kid is on fire. I predict his EP rockets to the top of the sharts.

#9 Comment By Noah172 On March 14, 2019 @ 10:44 am

jafnhar wrote:

We all hate rich people until someone starts talking about punitive taxation, no? Why is this kid’s tax rate not 70%?

His father earns the income. I doubt this young man has much income to his name.

The tax issue is more complicated than you are making it. How much revenue will “punitive” rates raise? Not enough to pay for the left’s wish list, that’s for sure. Not enough even to close our existing budget deficit (for which Republicans deserve much of the blame, to be sure). How will top earners avoid (not evade; avoid = legal, evade = illegal) the “punitive” taxes? What will the macroeconomic effects be?

I have no objection to some sort of tax increase on top earners (some increase is necessary), but we need to be realistic, not moralistic, about what such an increase can do and what it cannot.

#10 Comment By MikeCA On March 14, 2019 @ 11:18 am

Not addressed to you,Rod but to all the trumpistas; yes, these overly entitled wealthy people should be held accountable and even suffer some social approbation. Fair enough. Care to hold the president,his family & cronies to the same standards? I mean the appeal of Trump is that he’s real & keeps it real,yes? Perhaps his diehard supporters should do likewise.
Yes,liberals everywhere are triggered or owned which I’m sure is great fun. But do you ever worry about the long term damage to not only our democracy but our social norms long after Trump leaves office? Not concern trolling(I’ve got other pressing concerns at the moment) but genuinely curious. Sometimes it seems like people really do want to “ blow it all up” consequences be damned. But then what? It seems like sheer nihilism.

#11 Comment By Chaswjd On March 14, 2019 @ 11:20 am

Can there be any doubt but that Pinketty was very, very wrong?

#12 Comment By Curious Reader On March 14, 2019 @ 12:45 pm

JCM asked, “Once they are in, how do they keep these less than-promising youths from flunking out?”

Here’s my partial answer. Once, when I was very poor, I followed up on an online advert asking for skilled academic writers. The whole hiring process was online. After jumping through a few hoops, I was hired. When I logged in to the site for work assignments, I discovered that I had been hired by a sophisticated freelance paper mill, probably offshore, that wrote papers–from 3 page first year compositions to full on doctoral dissertations– priced by page count. The more specific and the shorter the time frame, the higher the price per page.

I did not ever take any assignments from that employer. I did occasionally log on to see what feckless students needed done for them.

This was back around 2010. I’m sure that the wonders of the internet have only improved the process since then.

You can go through higher education not doing much or perhaps any of your own work if you just know how to work the possibilities, as long as you’ve got enough money.

#13 Comment By Siarlys Jenkins On March 14, 2019 @ 1:01 pm

These are the people the Gulag was originally intended for. No, I don’t advocate that, just trying to put things in perspective. If the last emperor of China could make a productive, competent, and even happy gardener, I’m sure these folks can find useful occupations too, once deprived of their sinecures.

Care to hold the president,his family & cronies to the same standards?

I’m sure a lot of Trump voters would be happy too. The president’s performance in office is his own worst enemy. But they won’t vote for Kamala Harris, and neither will I. As a “person of color” she’s a post-modernist joke.

The tax issue is more complicated than you are making it. How much revenue will “punitive” rates raise? Not enough to pay for the left’s wish list, that’s for sure.

What we need is comprehensive policies to flatten income inequality. What could better be called “confiscatory” tax rates are one tool to do that. We need a substantial middle range where fifty percent taxation is enough that people won’t walk away from another million just because they only get to keep $500,000. But at some point, it really needs to be pointless to pay a CEO $100 million a year, because s/he just won’t get to keep much more than they already have. College football coaches too.

Sensible tax policies could provide substantial breaks for money that is actually invested in NEW production — as distinct from buying and selling old sheets of paper. There is a social good to that. But the reinvested capital from commercial revenues… needs to be spread more broadly in terms of ultimate beneficiaries.

And, I’m becoming quite focused on the idea of amending the minimum wage laws to provide that in addition to a flat monetary minimum, the lowest paid worker in any enterprise must receive at least one percent of the annual compensation paid to the highest paid executive.

the efforts of the parents in this fiasco suggest that the elites are having no better success in passing along the skills and values that made them successful than many others

This is why hereditary monarchies are so inefficient and destructive. Its also why inheritance taxes on large fortunes should be 100 percent. Let the dead pay more of the taxes, give the living a break and let them keep more of their hard-earned wages, and let the children of the wealthy and successful make their own way in the world, by the sweat of their brow.

#14 Comment By Nick Upstead On March 14, 2019 @ 1:29 pm

Serious question. Can anyone succinctly tell me what was illegal here? Bribing a membership officer to get into essentially a private club is legal, right? It might be against club rules, but not illegal. If its a public school I could understand. Were these all public schools or are they somehow subject to legal rules because they take public money, yadda yadda? I’m not trying to make excuses for anyone and I’m not trying to be argumentative I’m just literally curious about what laws were broken.

#15 Comment By Fran Macadam On March 14, 2019 @ 3:16 pm

Obviously the answer to this must be to allow bankers to get in on funding dope deals, as TAC’s Norm Singleton just urged.

#16 Comment By Fran Macadam On March 14, 2019 @ 3:24 pm

MikeCA:

Try as I might, I can’t find any alternative politicians who don’t want to “blow up” almost everything that I believe in.

I call it TDS when people see actual criminal acts, and say it’s all a waste of time and it should be ignored to go after what they think is the source of everything they don’t like, DJT.

#17 Comment By Locksley On March 14, 2019 @ 5:27 pm

“. . . [A] New York Post story so sweet and rich and buttery you just want it to sit there like a nugget of salted caramel, melting on your tongue forever.”

Brilliant! The true pothead weltanschauung. I loved it.

#18 Comment By BC On March 14, 2019 @ 6:07 pm

MikeCA: No, I don’t worry about the long-term damage to not only our democracy but our social norms long after Trump leaves office. The reason I don’t worry about those things is that the last Democratic president spent the entire eight years of his tenure aggrandizing executive power and deliberately rending the social fabric, and with few exceptions his ideological fellow-travelers had nary a disapproving word to say about it.

I refuse to hold Donald Trump to standards that the left categorically refused to apply to Barack Obama. To do otherwise would be to allow the left to weaponize my principles against me, and to play me for a chump.

#19 Comment By David Allen On March 14, 2019 @ 7:22 pm

George Oscar Bluth, Jr.

#20 Comment By Dale R McNamee On March 14, 2019 @ 8:28 pm

Rod,
The title of your article is quite appropriate and the accompanying photo shows what pot user “under the influence” looks like and is an effective ad for not using it…