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Ban These Books, Please

It’s Banned Books Week again. Six years ago, Mitch Muncy wrote what I consider to be the definitive piece on what a content-free swivet Banned Books Week is. Nevertheless, Matthew Schmitz has a fun piece up listing his choices for Seven Books That Should Be Banned. Among them:

Atlas Shrugged, The Fountainhead, etc. by Ayn Rand

Badly written and tendentious, Rand’s books give readers a tidy explanation of matters personal, economic, and political. Her materialist and godless world is also a perverse and cruel one.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Also badly written and tendentious, Coates’s books give readers a tidy explanation of matters personal, economic, and political. His materialist and godless world is also a perverse and cruel one. Excuse me if I seem to repeat myself—it’s hard not to. Coates is quickly becoming the Left’s answer to Rand. Better to stop him before the transformation is complete.

Read the whole thing.  Now, before you too go into a swivet, Schmitz is not actually calling on the government to ban these or any books. He’s using BBW as an opportunity to list some books that are, or have been, popular, but which have been harmful.

So, let’s hear it from you readers. Which books would you “ban,” in the sense of “wishing that they had never been published and that no one would read them any more” — and why?

Be brief — and don’t say the Bible, the Quran, or any other sacred text. Too easy.

(Hey readers, I’m going to leave for Texas shortly. Speaking at Baylor this afternoon on the Benedict Option, and then on Thursday about Dante. Will post when I can, and approve comments as I am able.)

about the author

Rod Dreher is a senior editor at The American Conservative. He has written and edited for the New York Post, The Dallas Morning News, National Review, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, the Washington Times, and the Baton Rouge Advocate. Rod’s commentary has been published in The Wall Street Journal, Commentary, the Weekly Standard, Beliefnet, and Real Simple, among other publications, and he has appeared on NPR, ABC News, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and the BBC. He lives in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, with his wife Julie and their three children. He has also written four books, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming, Crunchy Cons, How Dante Can Save Your Life, and The Benedict Option.

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