Author Archives: Charles F. McElwee III

Who Speaks For the Suffering Upper Middle Class?

New data suggest these high income earners are living paycheck to paycheck, have fewer assets, and can’t retire.

After Two Decades of Growth, Philadelphia Still Feels Left Behind

The author of Friday Night Lights also profiled the death and life of American cities.

Mourning in America: The Day RFK Was Shot in Los Angeles

Fifty years later, we have yet to fully digest the emotional and cultural consequences of Kennedy’s assassination.

The ‘Rust Belt’ Echoes American Loss, But It’s No Cliché

New anthology challenges us to resist the urge to make of this place ‘a talking point, or a polling data set.’

Heinz, Santorum, and the GOP’s Working Class Legacy In Pennsylvania

Voters in Tuesday’s special election were shaped by these nearly forgotten figures.

Slow Fade of the Pennsylvania Irish

A new book tells the story of the immigrants from Donegal who still inhabit modern-day Trump Country.

How the GOP Can Hang on to the Working Class

Donald Trump’s election shows this political courtship is real. But it will only continue if Republicans respond in kind.

Philadelphia’s Boulevard of Broken Dreams

Benjamin Franklin Parkway was supposed to make Philly more like Paris. But it came of age with the automobile.

Morton Downey Jr. Hosted the Original Trump Rally—30 Years Ago

“Loudmouth” provocateur created the populist talk show format—then lost it.

Remembering Moynihan in the Age of Trump

If the late senator-scholar were alive, he would see his most acute societal warnings confirmed.

Kennedy’s Forgotten Coalition: Working Class Catholics

After decades of Democratic fealty, JFK’s “tribal benediction” went Trump.

When Historic Preservation Depends on Gentrification

To survive, smaller cities need economic and cultural capital.

It’s Time to Read John O’Hara Again

The forgotten author reminds us that frustration with the establishment is a long American tradition.

Did John Updike Foresee the Trump Era?

What the Rabbit novels teach us about our populist moment