Arts & Letters

The Anti-Respectibility Politics of Philip Roth

The iconic postwar novelist shocked a generation by aggressively daring people to confront and even reclaim Jewish-American stereotypes.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of May 21

From J.R.R. Tolkien to Josef Pieper, TAC writers Olmstead, Larison and Beauchamp share what they are reading this week

Walker Percy’s Funny and Frightening Prophecy

The novel he said “rocks the boat” portrays a chilling and alarmingly plausible future.

E.R. Dodds and Our Age of Anxiety

He saw a reflection of our modern age in the Hellenic struggle with individual choice centuries ago.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of May 14

From James Burnham to Ross Douthat, here’s what our staff and writers are reading.

Roger Scruton’s Britain

The conservative great turns his sharp eye on Brexit and the crisis in his home country.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of May 7

From Hannah Arendt to Mary Wollstonecraft, here’s what our staff and writers are reading this week.

MORE IN Arts & Letters

When National Review Turned 15

Beardie-weirdies, nihilists, and radicals: a look at 1970 through conservative eyes.

David Mamet Turns Literary Scalpel on 1920s Chicago

New novel simultaneously captures the dynamism of a hustling society, while depicting its corroded core.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of April 30

From Aldous Huxley’s deathbed wish to musings on ‘junkyard’ suburbia, here’s what our staff and writers are reading.

TAC at 15: Still Fighting After All These Years

One of our founders on how GOP-led regime change across Middle East birthed this influential conservative ‘countercultural’ magazine.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of April 23

Our writers on Wendell Berry, Russell Kirk, Philip Payton and more this week.

Acquitting Elvis of Cultural Appropriation

His groundbreaking rock-n-roll was neither ‘thievery’ nor ‘derivative blackness.’

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of April 16

From Steven Pinker to Christopher Lasch, it seems everyone is reading about liberalism this week.

Chappaquiddick: No Mercy for Ted Kennedy

The new film is painful, hypnotizing, and will leave viewers longing for justice.

Neal Freeman’s National Review

A veteran writer offers up a vivid portrait of William F. Buckley and the early conservative movement.

Steve Coll’s Directorate S is Disturbing Account of U.S. Mistakes After 9/11

‘Ghost Wars’ author on the secret war behind the war in Afghanistan.