Arts & Letters

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of July 16

From Robert Sobel’s Coolidge to Ray Bradbury’s ‘wicked’ ways, our TAC editors on what they are reading today.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of July 9

Here’s what our editors and writers are reading.

Finding the Literary Truths in Alcoholism and Recovery

New memoir tackles personal addiction and familiar tropes about creativity under the influence.

How Corporations Won Their Civil Rights

The Court got it right—but it’s not a conclusion we should be entirely comfortable with.

Mister Rogers’ Ministry

A new documentary on the life of Fred Rogers rekindles the transformative power of neighborliness.

Globalization and Its Discontents

Ian Bremmer blames globalism for our populist moment. But does he overstate his case?

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of July 2

Here’s what our staff and writers are reading.

MORE IN Arts & Letters

What Would Tocqueville Do?

James Poulos’s The Art of Being Free is a perceptive, though flawed, Tocquevillian analysis.

The Liberal Arts Won’t Save Our Souls

But they may yet forestall our base urges and make good citizens out of us. Cable news can never accomplish that.

In Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, a Consistent Life Ethic Finds a Way

More than its predecessors, this dino thriller comes with a strong natural-law sense of right and wrong.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of June 25

From Yuval Levin to essays on localism, here’s what our staff is reading.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of June 18

From agrarian wisdom of Wendell Berry to the gumshoe grist of Raymond Chandler, our editors and writers share what they are reading.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of June 11

Here’s what our staff and writers are reading.

TAC Bookshelf for the Week of June 4

From Nathanael West to Mickey Edwards, here’s what our staff and writers are reading this week.

The ‘Rust Belt’ Echoes American Loss, But It’s No Cliché

New anthology challenges us to resist the urge to make of this place ‘a talking point, or a polling data set.’

Reassessing Woodrow Wilson, Crusader President

New biography offers fair-minded portrait of a vain moralist and political visionary whose certitude exceeded his judgment.

The Anti-Respectability Politics of Philip Roth

The iconic postwar novelist shocked a generation by aggressively daring people to confront and even reclaim Jewish-American stereotypes.