My own reading of the Mearsheimer-Walt paper found it unremarkable, a bit sloppy and one-sided (nothing here about the Arab oil lobby), but nothing that even a casual newspaper reader does not know. Its basic point — that Israel’s American supporters have immense influence over U.S. foreign policy — is inarguable. [italics mine] After all, President Bush has just recently given Israel NATO-like status without so much as a murmur from Congress. “I made it clear, I’ll make it clear again, that we will use military might to protect our ally Israel,” Bush said. This was the second or third time he’s made this pledge, crossing a line that previous administrations would not — in effect, promulgating a treaty seemingly on the spot. No other country gets this sort of treatment. [italics mine]

Israel’s special place in U.S. foreign policy is deserved, in my view, and not entirely the product of lobbying. Israel has earned it, and isn’t there something bracing about a special relationship that is not based on oil or markets or strategic location but on shared values? (A bit now like Britain.) But I can understand how foreign policy “realists” such as Mearsheimer and Walt might question its utility and not only think that a bit too much power is located in a specific lobby but that it is rarely even discussed. This may be wrong, but it is not (necessarily) anti-Semitic. In fact, after reading the Mearsheimer-Walt paper, the respected Israeli newspaper Haaretz not only failed to discern anti-Semitism but commended the paper to its readers. “The professors’ article does not deserve condemnation,” Haaretz stated in an editorial. ~Richard Cohen, The Washington Post

Via Steve Sailer