“Duke Faculty Say No”:

Duke University faculty members, frustrated with their administration and skeptical of the degrees to be awarded, have forced the institution to back out of a deal with nine other universities and 2U to create a pool of for-credit online classes for undergraduates.

I see.

The courses were to be offered by Duke and other top-tier universities in a partnership organized by 2U, formerly known as 2tor. Unlike massive open online courses, or MOOCs, only a few hundred students were expected to enroll in each course – which would feature a mix of recorded lectures and live discussions – but each course would be divided into sections of no more than 20 students led by an instructor, perhaps a graduate student.

“Only a few hundred students.”

“This had more to do with the politics of telling the provost he didn’t consult enough with the faculty, which I feel was bologna,” Bass said. “But, yeah, that’s how it went.”

Bologna?

Lange said Duke will continue to explore online offerings. “I don’t take this as a, ‘Let’s not do this,’” he said. “I take this as a, ‘Let’s figure out what the best way to do this is.’”

How many times do we have to tell you? No means Yes.