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View From Your Table

Venice, Italy

That was an early supper last night: cichetti (bar snacks) with Prosecco. Prosecco is a local wine in the Veneto region, so I’m drinking it with every meal. The local Prosecco is crisper and slightly more effervescent than what we get in the US. It’s very satisfying.

Then, later, here is what we had for dinner:

Venice, Italy

As you can see, I got my grilled baby octopus, as I had been dreaming of. It came atop a serving of casseroled potatoes that had been prepared with olive oil and fresh black olives. It was a new taste to me, and entirely delicious.

I had been hoping to eat like a boss here, but Matt and I find that Venice simply overwhelms us. And it’s too hot to eat much anyway. Today we went to the Divine Liturgy at San Giorgio dei Greci, then ate at a pasta place not too far away. I had spaghetti with calamari. This is not so much a VFYT as it is a shot of food. I was so hungry after the Eucharistic fast that I forgot the VFYT aesthetic for this one. Sorry:

Venice, Italy

Let’s not forget the gelato (in this case, fig and walnut):

Venice, Italy

The wi-fi at my Venice hotel is very slow, so I haven’t had the opportunity to post my final Germany VFYTs. So here they are. Here is probably the best meal of the entire trip: fish soup at Fisch Witte [1], in the Munich Viktualienmarkt:

Munich, Germany

If you visit Munich, you must not miss this place!

Finally, here are a couple of VFYTs I received from readers in recent days:

Lake Lauerz, Switzerland

The blueness of the lake!

Huanchacho, Peru

The reader is preparing to eat fried cuy — that is, fried guinea pig. Better him than me, is what I say.

21 Comments (Open | Close)

21 Comments To "View From Your Table"

#1 Comment By elizabeth On June 18, 2017 @ 11:59 am

Lovely pix. BTW, cut is said to taste like chicke.

#2 Comment By elizabeth On June 18, 2017 @ 12:01 pm

Oh please. Dang autocorrect! Cuy. Cuy. Cuy.

#3 Comment By James C On June 18, 2017 @ 12:34 pm

Heh, looks like Matthew doesn’t like pomodorini (cherry tomatoes) on his pizza. Good man! I pick mine off too.

Fig gelato. So you CAN get it up north. Thank God!

Fish soup in Munich. German cuisine is so underrated. People don’t realise how much variety it has. It’s not only wurst, schnitzel and pretzels (as wonderful as those things are). A girl I know from Schleswig-Holstein (up on the North Sea) told me the meals there are heavily based on seafood. But fish soup in Munich? That’s a surprise.

—–

I’ve had the Peruvian deep-fried guinea pig. You don’t know what you’re missing. Just make sure you don’t look at the guinea pig’s horror-filled face as you’re eating it. And eat plenty of sides as there’s hardly any meat on the poor thing.

#4 Comment By James C On June 18, 2017 @ 12:41 pm

To the reader in Lake Lauerz: thanks for the photo! What a beautiful spot. I never heard of lake until now. I see it’s next to Lake Lucerne (where I’ve been a couple of times) but I must have had my eye on the big treasure while missing out on the glittering little jewel next to it.

What are you eating? I see a bottle of Montepulciano d’Abruzzo (good choice), along with some cheese, sausages, bread and (maybe) fondue?

#5 Comment By Brendan On June 18, 2017 @ 2:36 pm

Venice is indeed overwhelming, I remember feeling the same way my first time there. Incredible place really.

#6 Comment By Brandon On June 18, 2017 @ 9:37 pm

I hope you have time to see the Scuola of San Rocco and the Tinteretto Crucifixion while you are in Venice.

#7 Comment By Barret On June 19, 2017 @ 1:05 am

That guinea pig looks like deep fried heart burn!

#8 Comment By Johannes On June 19, 2017 @ 4:29 am

Venice is like Hawaii, it really does look like the picture postcards and sometimes seems almost like its own fake or Disney version but it is real.
(And the Venetian bad smell from the water might be a seasonal thing; I had heard often that it smelled badly but found it not much different from other seaside locations when I visited the city.)

#9 Comment By Khalid On June 19, 2017 @ 8:19 am

Sound like you’re having a wonderful time! Totally envious!:))
Venice is a gorgeous city.

Rod, look forward to a post on the ” war” in Finsbury Park!

In the meantime, and with your permission, here’s a picture that, for me, encapsulates just why London is such a wonderful place.

[2]

Reading Pabst and Milbank’s book now. Why do self- styled conservatives invariably write without any flair?

#10 Comment By James Bradshaw On June 19, 2017 @ 7:45 pm

Prosecco is good alone, but it mixes very well with vodka.

I have never been to Italy, but my entire family is considering a sort of reunion on the Amalfi Coast.

I’ve been reluctant to say “yes” (I hate traveling), but these pictures are certainly persuasive!

#11 Comment By Uncle Billy On June 19, 2017 @ 8:17 pm

I love good Italian food. Baltimore has a “Little Italy” with many Italian restaurants, some good, some no so good, but I do love most dishes at the better Italian restaurants (not Olive Garden!).

I am not Italian, but when I was growing up, I had some Italian friends and I loved visiting their homes and having their mother (or even better, their grandmother) cook for us.

The Italians have a love of life, good food and good wine that is truly wonderful. I’ve been to both France and Italy and I must say that I like the French cuisine, but I like the Italian cuisine perhaps even more. I like the Italian people a little more too.

#12 Comment By Jen On June 19, 2017 @ 9:56 pm

Guinea pig is not bad. I’ve had it several times and found it kind of bland. And horrifying when prepared with the face still on.

#13 Comment By James C On June 20, 2017 @ 2:18 pm

James Bradshaw, do consider very seriously that Amalfi reunion: [3]

I think Campania has the best food in Italy.

#14 Comment By William Norwich On June 20, 2017 @ 3:48 pm

I wonder how appealing the BenOp would be if Rod had to give up his gourmandizing.

[NFR: Feasting is as important as fasting. Are you a Puritan? Because most Christians are not. — RD]

#15 Comment By Deplorable Me On June 20, 2017 @ 5:52 pm

Rod, are you OK? You’ve been quiet!

[NFR: Yes! I arrived at my Dallas hotel around midnight last night, having begun my journey by catching an 8 am water taxi to the Venice airport. Given the time difference, that meant I was traveling for 23 hours straight. I was so exhausted that I’ve been sleeping most of the day. — RD]

#16 Comment By William Norwich On June 20, 2017 @ 8:43 pm

Nothing wrong with feasting, Rod. It’s your feasting like a pharaoh and fasting like a pharisee that rubs one the wrong way.

[NFR: “One,” eh? Perhaps you are disinclined to right rubbing? — RD]

#17 Comment By Hector_St_Clare On June 20, 2017 @ 11:06 pm

The fish soup, the guinea pig and the octopus all look amazing. I really want to try cooking a fish soup some time. As for the guinea pig, never eaten one, but I’ve been told they’re not that different than rabbit, but a bit more porky-tasting.

Fish soup in Munich. German cuisine is so underrated. People don’t realise how much variety it has. It’s not only wurst, schnitzel and pretzels (as wonderful as those things are). A girl I know from Schleswig-Holstein (up on the North Sea) told me the meals there are heavily based on seafood. But fish soup in Munich? That’s a surprise.

I think German cooking is definitely underrated (and Central European more generally). I saw a German cookbook once and the variety of stuff in there was incredible.

#18 Comment By Hector_St_Clare On June 20, 2017 @ 11:10 pm

How was the grilled octopus, Rod?

When I lived in Madagascar, dried octopus was a very common and fairly cheap source of protein there. Fishermen would catch them and sun-dry them, and you would cut off a bit and rehydrate it as needed when you wanted to make a stew. They were extremely tough and nearly inedible when dry, and the rubbery texture was something else.

[NFR: It was delicious, really delicious. The texture is just right: firm but not rubbery, like calamari is (and I like calamari). Best grilled octopus I’ve ever had was at Molyvos in NYC. — RD]

#19 Comment By Ryan Booth On June 21, 2017 @ 10:18 am

For those curious about my cuy, I will say that the meat is rich and dark, and (as another commenter pointed out) there isn’t a whole lot of it. The skin was delicious and really the best part of the animal. I’d eat cuy again, but it’s not cheap and not “worth eating on a regular basis. Indeed, Peruvians only eat it on special occasions.

I ate that cuy at the beginning of my Peru trip. Since then, I’ve seen much more cuy offered roasted, rather than fried.

#20 Comment By mrscracker On June 21, 2017 @ 11:41 am

William Norwich says:

I wonder how appealing the BenOp would be if Rod had to give up his gourmandizing.”
*************
Much of the food I see in this blog is, or at one time was, just considered country fare. Many “gourmet” meals were peasant meals in their country of origin.
I tend to shy away from overwrought & over priced food. Especially anything from a menu with lengthy descriptions or containing the word “Fusion.”
I’d rather a take-out plate lunch from the Piggly Wiggly. But I see those same old school, Southern foods being “rediscovered” & trendy, so maybe I’m a “gourmand” now, too.
I’ve lived long enough to learn that if you keep on doing something, it eventually will become hip.
🙂

#21 Comment By mrscracker On June 21, 2017 @ 11:48 am

Hector_St_Clare says:
I think German cooking is definitely underrated (and Central European more generally). I saw a German cookbook once and the variety of stuff in there was incredible.”
*************
I agree. There are some regional German recipes we almost never see outside of Germany. Mixing fruit & vegetables in a dish (Irish potatoes with pears, sauerkraut with pineapple, etc.) It’s really interesting.