Reader Quizman writes:

For whatever it is worth, the changing culture, particularly in millennial run companies are not the result of anti-white sentiment as much as it is an anti-reason sentiment.

Until recently, I, a middle-aged brown Asian first generation legal immigrant, was at a millennial run company in the SF Bay Area. I was astounded by the penetration of gender-studies SJW woke-types in HR and their ability to influence policy and mould company culture. There were clubs/groups meant for the usual minority groups (LGBTQ, Black, Women) and so on which were used to advocate for recruitment policy changes.

Now, I am all for certain types of diversity that enhances company culture and helps serve markets better, but this group – which were largely comprised of millennial white women with colored hair – was responsible for tilting the diversity debate towards race and sex based determination. There was a conspicuous policy of age-discrimination against older male engineers which often was disguised in terms of ‘cultural fit’. I was shocked when one of these HR ‘change-agents’ came to a staff meeting of a VP and asked one of the line managers (a young American male of Chinese origin) how many women and minorities were in his team. In her world, Asians were not minorities. She was advocating that the manager select latino, black and women engineers first and foremost. Clearly, this is illegal based on California laws, but it is quite common as this recent lawsuit against Google bears out.

My centrist Irish-Italian American work colleague used to joke that the group ‘Women in tech’ were actually a misnomer for ‘White women in tech’ since these were usually unemployable women (Social Science degrees) who wanted engineering jobs and claimed discrimination. He would remark that the Asian women engineers were invisible since most of them were not promoted beyond a certain point. (How many Asian women VPs/Directors have you seen? They all peak out at manager-levels.)

Many Asians are also angry that the University of California system as well as the Ivy League actively discriminates against them. The American Conservative had the best article on this topic. Many of us legal immigrants, (massive) taxpayers to boot, were outraged when Janet Napolitano used public funds and quotas for admitting & aiding illegal immigrants into the UC system at the expense of our children’s futures. This, in any reasonable citizen’s understanding, is unpatriotic.

I waited in queue for 10 years to become an American citizen. This after two engineering degrees and an MBA from a top 3 US school. Yet, I fear for the future of my children. I cannot even express my angst against these policies to some friends because they’ve all bought into the “compassion not hate” false paradigm.

As practicing theists (Asian religion), we are a minority since our Facebook wall is filled by friends posts that mock religion and religious folks. These people display very little understanding of the philosophy that undergirds religion and blindly quote modern atheists.

Additionally, the turmoil and cultural change caused by the massive influx of Muslim refugees is seen as a non-event. An Iranian friend of mine remarked that such a massive change is cause for concern. “Heck”, she said, “if Merkel had let in a million blonde haired blue eyed Norwegians in, it would have been traumatic. Never mind, culturally alien Arabs.” Granted that as an Iranian, she has a visceral dislike for Arabs, but still, her statement has merit.

Apologies for the long rant, but I wanted to shed light on the angst felt by non-white people of a certain age and political allegiance. We are mostly centre, centre-right folks who believe that there is no party that represents them today.

And this, by the way, is felt across the non-Islamic world. The media might label people who have such views as ‘fascists’ or ‘Christian right’ or ‘Hindu right’, but this movement is gaining steam. Alas, the people who lead these movements are self-serving bigots, but nature abhors a vacuum and the only enterprising people to exploit this market are the worst of the lot.

We’re in for some interesting, albeit scary times ahead.

How can people like us find each other and help each other? I don’t want to live in a world that systematically discriminates against Asians, or Muslims, or anybody else. America’s situation with Muslim immigrants is rather different than Europe’s, for various reasons. I’ve said publicly and in private e-mails to “Jones,” a Muslim reader, that I want to find ways to work constructively with believing Muslims like him, who are not Salafists, but just ordinary religious conservatives who want to live in peace — and who see the regnant and emerging order in contemporary America to be a mortal threat to their way of life. Believe me, I would a thousand times rather have Jones and his wife and kids living next door to me than someone who professes my religion and shares my ethnic background, but who is fully bought into the decadent ambient culture. Same with Quizman, the Asian who follows traditional Asian religion.

Pluralism is a fact of American life. That is not going to change. Anybody who thinks it is going to change is deluded. But as Quizman says, the pluralist world that the SJWs, the Human Resource types, and the professional Left is pushing for is not based on reason, but on pure power and grievance. Quizman is right: you may be thought of today as a minority, but when you get on the other side of the SJW Left, you will very quickly be made into an Enemy Of The People.

I will stand with Jones and Quizman against the mobs of the left and the right. Weirdly, I guess that makes me, a wet reactionary on most days, a de facto old-fashioned liberal.