Author Archives: Eve Tushnet

About Eve Tushnet

Eve Tushnet is a writer in Washington, DC. She blogs at Patheos and has written for Commonweal, USA Today, and the Weekly Standard, among other publications. She is working on a book on vocation for gay Catholics. Her email is [email protected] and she can be found on Twitter at @evetushnet.

Open relationships are torture

‘The Commune’ is a Punishing Movie

The Long Years After Failure

After the Storm is a slow movie about a hard passage in middle-aged life.

Grandfather Had Fangs

Snakish is a novel about decline and fall, the passing of a way of life.

Spirits, What Have You to Say?

A movie about a haunted Ouija board has surprising depth—until it falls apart.

Order, Chaos, Peace

Brent Bozell, an architect of the conservative movement, ended up trusting an order no man could impose.

Escape From Detroit

Don’t Breathe is an effective horror flick whose least-effective elements hide its real insights.

The Right to Look Your Judge in the Eye

Equality is found in the brute fact that we are individual, embodied human beings.

There’s No Cure for Vice

Today’s newest antiheroes don’t pretend to be anything other than what they are: terrible people.

Humiliation and Reconciliation

What medieval penance can tell us about making modern-day amends.

City of Good Intentions

The nation’s capital is divided into dateline Washington and hometown DC.

The Holey Family

In the film Little Sister, everybody is damaged and betrayed—but they are genuinely forgiven.

Tower Block Dystopia

In High-Rise, the initial glamour of 1970s modernism descends into decadence and violence.

Famous Monsters of Filmland

Tim Powers weaponizes nostalgia in a novel haunted by the past.

Poor Citizenship

A coming-of-age film highlights how even in communist Cuba, faith sustains the underclass.

Love and Death in the Multiverse

Constellations is a moving exploration of the human drive for control.

Out in the Fields with God

“The Witch” is a powerful brew of family tragedy, religious drama, and horror show.

Stephen King’s Doubt

The novel ‘Revival’ mixes Ray Bradbury and H.P. Lovecraft to depict an untrusting America.

Exterminatrix

Revisiting Sarah Schulman’s satire-tragedy of 1990s New York City

‘Hamilton’ and the Romance of Government

The hit Broadway musical risks becoming a love song to America’s regime.

Discipline and Rupture at Christmastime

Reading Foucault and de Caussade into an Advent carol of relief over reform

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