Author Archives: Daniel Larison

About Daniel Larison

Daniel Larison is a senior editor at TAC, where he also keeps a solo blog. He has been published in the New York Times Book Review, Dallas Morning News, Orthodox Life, Front Porch Republic, The American Scene, and Culture11, and is a columnist for The Week. He holds a PhD in history from the University of Chicago, and resides in Dallas. Follow him on Twitter.

The Week’s Most Interesting Reads

Libya and the tides of history. Noah Millman reflects on Shakespeare and …

The Folly of Arming Ukraine

Neither Ukraine nor the U.S. would benefit from it.

The Terrible Idea of an Alliance with Iraq

A formal alliance with Iraq would add nothing to U.S. security, but would ensure that the U.S. will be entangled in Iraqi affairs for decades to come.

Webb Is Running for President

His entry into the race should be very good and healthy for the Democratic Party and the country.

Jeb Bush and Foreign Policy

The country was already badly misled once by crediting a younger Bush with following in the foreign policy tradition of his father.

Global “Policing” Is a Recipe for Chaos

Stephens’ notion of global “policing” amounts to a pretext for regime change with no concern for what takes the place of the deposed government.

Power’s Warning: Don’t Think About Failed Interventions

Power thinks Americans need to be warned away from counting the costs of failed policies.

Lessons from the Libyan War

One lesson that the Libyan war should teach us is that the U.S. and its allies are far too quick to want to take sides in foreign disputes and conflicts.

Jefferson and the Uses of U.S. Power

The U.S. ought to conserve its strength, husband its resources, and exercise restraint.

The Illegal War Against ISIS and Congress’ Abdication

Congress has been allowed and even encouraged in its abdication by an administration that pretends that it doesn’t need a new AUMF.

Are Americans “Squeamish” About War?

Most Americans are usually only too ready to support military action when the president claims it to be necessary.

Revisiting the Libyan War

The arguments for intervention in Libya were extraordinarily weak and many of them were based on little more than wishful thinking.

2016 and the Third-Term “Curse”

Voters’ fatigue with the Democrats could be a serious problem for their nominee in 2016.

Santorum’s Terrible Foreign Policy Record and Hopeless Campaign

Very few recent members of the Senate have been wrong more often on so many foreign policy issues in such a short period of time as Santorum.

Why the Myth of “Winning” the Iraq War Is So Harmful

The myth feeds the hawks’ ideological fantasy that the Iraq war was not wrong from the very beginning.

History Has No Tides

History doesn’t have right or wrong sides, and it doesn’t have tides, either.

A “Broken Windows” Foreign Policy Is Madness

A “broken windows” foreign policy is one that would make the U.S. more likely to resort to force more often than it already does over even more trivial causes.

The Week’s Most Interesting Reads

The truth about the wars. Daniel Bolger reflects on the wars in …

How the Scottish “Neverendum” Will End

Each time that London has sought to kill off Scottish nationalism, it has simply given the nationalists another platform from which to promote their agenda.

George Will and the Iraq War Dead-Enders

The people that have to explain themselves are the Iraq war hawks that continue to spread falsehoods about that war to defend an indefensible policy.

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